Tag Archives: Yogjakarta

SEE YOU NEXT TIME

20130527-235215.jpg

Sadly enough we’re almost at the end of our trip to Indonesia. Next week we will head back to The Netherlands, inspired by all the beautiful things we saw and with our heads full of new ideas! Now it’s time to go back to reality again and focus on what we’re going to do next. Ade is currently busy planning a ‘Europe trip’ and will probably join some conventions around Germany, Poland, Spain, later this year. Again, we don’t have any concrete dates and places yet, but if we know more we will inform you.

For now; Thank you again Indonesia! See you soon!

 

For Indonesian customers:

There where some people who wanted to get tattooed while Ade was in Indonesia this time, but didn’t had the opportunity. Because of that Ade decided that he might return to Indonesia later this year. We have no exact dates yet but if we have more details they will be uploaded here on the blog.

For the Dutch customers:

Thanks to all the people who send an email so far who want to get tattooed by Ade when he returns to The Netherlands! Around the 10th of June Ade will start sending out dates for appointments for the months June/July/August. Due to the big amount of emails there is a waiting list.  Please be patient! Try not to sent multiple emails. People will be added to the list in order of the date the emails being send, to be fair. It usually takes up to 2 (sometimes 3) weeks to respond to emails, due to the volume of emails Ade receives.

If you’re interested in making an appointment with Ade, please send an email to: thisis369@gmail.com with where, what and size, reference photos and if possible photos of the body part to be tattooed.

(Click on photo for bigger version)

20130527-235336.jpg

Share

THE MYSTERY OF THE CHICKEN CHURCH

Chicken_Church_1

Last week Ade and me made a trip to Yogjakarta, with actually one mission. Find the Chicken Church!

First I was not sure about making this post because something in me didn’t want to reveal the truth about this mysterious building. But because there’s so less information about this church on the internet, I had to share the true story.

A couple of months ago Ade read a status update of a friend on Facebook talking about a mysterious building called the Chicken Church located somewhere on the top of a mountain close to the famous temple the Borobudur in Magelang. I was instantly fascinated and I directly knew ‘We need to go there’. After checking around on the internet and Google earth (I was convinced the church was ‘photo-shopped’ into the map), I realized there was no one who could exactly explain anything about the history or function of the building, neither his age or exact location. I only knew this was certainly not a tourist attraction. I found a blog of someone in Indonesia who visited the church and gave a small explanation about how to go there. We decided to rent a car and see how close we could come.

We followed the given description and found a small gang leading to a even smaller road into a village. After wandering around for a while we realized we needed some help and decided to ask some locals. Easier said then done, because most people who live in small villages like that are elderly people. They live so isolated that they rarely have any visitors. Besides that they are always very happy to help you, but you have to accept and answer fully in Javanese (Very different from Bahasa), mostly in the style of ‘Aaaahhh yes! Here a little bit to the left… And then a little bit up the hill… And then you have to ask someone again…‘ You can imagine that those are not the most clear descriptions, but with a little bit of fantasy you can guess where you have to go. At the end of the road before we would really drive into the middle of nowhere we found a small house. We decided to ask the people if they could tell us the road to the church. They told us we only had to walk up hill for around 10-20 minutes and we would find the church ourselves. Parked the car and started walking. After crossing a very scary bamboo bridge and struggling for half an hour through the jungle we almost wanted to give up, until suddenly in front of us the head of the chicken appeared. I can tell you, it was the most surreal thing I ever saw. A 30 meter long, building in the shape of a chicken. Sadly enough we saw that the building was in a poor shape. The paint was peeled of the walls and the nice stone ornamental windows on the side of the church we’re damaged. The main structure of the church was still ok.

But the panoramic view was unbelievable. The weird thing is that your seeing something so great and that you want to share it, but that you are the only two people there. From the back of the church you could look into the auditorium of the church, that was empty beside some big white pillars. Because there was some sort of hole on the left side of the church, we realized that there had to be a whole floor underneath it. We decided not to enter the building because it simply looked to unsafe. In the ceiling of the church there was a big cross shaped ‘window’. After a while we decided we had to head back to the car before it would turn dark.

When we arrived in the hotel, I could’t get the church out of my head. Because there was such little information available, I needed to know more. The people in the village, told us it was owned by some Chinese business man who wanted to turn it into a hotel or that it served as a Christian Church, no clear explanations.

I decided to try to find any information on the internet and after being lead from one website to another I found that the church was also known as ‘Banyak Angkrem‘, which leaded me to a blog of a guy who was asking himself the same question as me ‘What is this place?‘.

The church turned out to be a dove instead of a chicken. His blog leaded me to an email conversation between a girl and a man who turned out to be the owner and builder of this strange church named Daniel Alamsjah. Finally some answers on all my questions!

Daniel was married to one of the woman in the nearby village in the 90’s, the story goes that one day in 1988 Daniel got a vision of God. God told him that he had to build a church on a hill in the shape of a dove. A place to unite Christians from all around the world. Every day God spoke to him in this vision . Until one day he decided to visit his mother in law who was living in a small village on the foot of the hill Menoreh, called Gombong. Daniel had a strong feeling that he needed to climb this hill, when he arrived on the top of the hill he decided to pray. ‘Was this the hill he saw in his visions?‘ He realized that he would never have enough money to buy this ground and build the church of his vision. He prayed and he prayed for days on top of the hill until he knew that God would help him no matter what. Within 6 months he managed to own 2,5 hectare of the ground on top of the hill and in 1994 he finally started building on his dream project. Due to the economic crisis in Indonesia that time, he run out of money and the sponsors who worked with him on this project him lost interest. In the time that the project came to an end he completed 70% of the church. Until today Daniel still believes that one day he will realize his dream project with the help of God.

What seemed to be a house of some mysterious, occult, society turned out to be a very ambitious, religious project of a man who got a vision of God.

Later I found some information on the internet that in the early days this building, in that time called Bukit Merpati, also served as a rehab clinic for drugs users. In the end, after finding out the true story it didn’t actually change anything about my opinion how surreal and somehow creepy this place was. Certainly something worth visiting when you’re around!


20130509-182235.jpg

Chicken_Church_2

Chicken_Church_4

Chicken_Church_9

Chicken_Church_8

Underneath here you can find a video impression of the church.

 

 

Share

BATIK STAMPS

Wahyu_Tumurun

Ade’s last piece is based on the Batik pattern, called Wahyu Tumurun from Yogjakarta. Wahyu Tumurun literally means ‘Divine blessing’ or ‘Revelation’. This motive is a symbol for humans wish for God’s blessing and enlightenment. Mostly people wear this batik if they’re hoping for a job promotion or recognition by their peers and superiors or simply to attain a better and prosperous life.

One of the tools they use to make a batik pattern on the traditional clothing of Indonesia like the one shown above are batik stamps. I’ve always been highly fascinated by those stamps. Batik stamps, or mostly called ‘cap‘, was invented around 1845 and mostly made of copper. Sometimes you will find batik stamps made of wood. The stamps are used to make the process of making batik easier.

They are used by dipping them into hot wax (Bee-wax) mixed with paraffin and applied to the cloth in a design. Then the cloth is dipped into a dye. All of the areas of the cloth that are covered with the wax do not absorb the dye and remain in their original color. When the cloth is dry, more wax is applied and then the cloth is dyed again, usually in a more darker color. This process will be continued until the desired design is completed. After that the wax is removed completely by ‘melting’ the cloth.

The stamps itself are great works of art. The’re made with total precision and eye for detail. I like to collect those stamps myself and I spend many hours wandering around on flea-markets to find these beautiful objects!

Batik_Stamp_6

(Click for bigger size)

For customers from Indonesia:

Ade is not booking in new customers for tattoo-appointments in the time that he will be here in Indonesia (Until 5 June). Thank you for all of your emails! He wishes he could work out all of them, but there’s not enough time to handle all of your requests.  Ade will probably return back to Indonesia later this year, so you can still send an email with your idea’s, placement and size to thisis369@gmail.com

Just keep an eye on the blog to know where Ade is working at the moment! 

Share