Tag Archives: Weapon

WAYANG KULIT – BIMA

Bima

After the Tattoo Convention Rotterdam 2016 (thanks everyone for dropping by!), last week Ade worked on an upper arm design inspired by a figure found in Wayang Kulit.

BIMA

Bima_2

 

Bima is the second of the Pandawa (Pandava) brothers and a leading character in the epic Mahabharata. He is a strong and bold character as reflected in his round eyes and wide
stance. He was surrounded by a whirlwind wherever he went and he is also instantly recognisable by his long fingernails that act as his weapon (Pancanaka).

He is seen as a heroic figure and known as a powerful figure, he is always rude and intimidating for the enemy, even though his heart soft. Bima characteristics are brave, steadfast, strong, stoic, obedient and honest, and he considers all people equal. He never curses or sits in front of a person he talks to. He has three wives and three children. Having descended from the wind god Vayu, Bima has the ability to fly, as does his half-brother Hanuman (Hanoman) and his son Ghatotkacha.

The vast majority of the ‘Wayang’ plays performed are drawn from the two great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata with as well as stories of Javanese origin. ‘Wayang kulit’ is considered as the highest of the Javanese performing arts. Performed in the royal courts of Java as early as the ninth century, this tradition continues to be treasured as one of the ‘pusaka’ or sacred heirlooms of the court. ‘Wayang kulit’ is traditionally performed on ritual days and religious ceremonies. It has also been adapted more recently for television and public education campaigns.

Here a nice example of some Wayang kulit play showing the character Bima.

Video by Antonius Oktaviano Wiriadjaja

 

Next thing is: Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2016! See you there!

– Lielo

 

 

 

 

 

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ADE ITAMEDA X OLIVIER

Hanuman_1

Last week a plan that was made years ago was finally executed. Olivier,  a long term friend and fellow tattoo-artist, came with the idea of a collaboration between him and Ade around 3 years ago, when both of the guys where still working in Rock’n Roll Tattoo studio in Jakarta. Because of all the travelling they never found a good moment to work it out. But last week, Olivier came up with a nice sketch of a wayang shadow puppet version of ‘Hanuman‘ pierced by a traditional Indonesian keris. Ade made a couple of adjustments and then it was ready!

 

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MARTIN’S SIDE PIECE

When used in Buddhist literature, the Sanskrit word vajra usually is defined “diamond” or “adamantine.” It can also mean “thunderbolt,” although this definition of vajra is more often associated with Hinduism.

A diamond is spotlessly pure and indestructible. As such, the word vajra sometimes signifies enlightenment, or the absolute reality of shunyata, “emptiness.”

The vajra also is ritual object associated with Tibetan Buddhism, also called by its Tibetan name, dorje. These objects usually are made of bronze, vary in size and have three, five or nine spokes that usually close at each end in lotus shape. The number of spokes and the way they come together, or not, at the ends have numerous symbolic meanings.

In Tibetan ritual, the vajra often is used together with a bell. The vajra is held in the left hand and represents the male principle, upaya, action or means. The bell is held in the right hand and represents the female principle, prajna, wisdom.

A double dorje, or vishvavajra, are two dorjes connected to form a cross. A double dorje represents the foundation of the physical world and is also associated with certain tantric deities.

 

Martin is one of Ade’s most supportive customers. Besides the Barong chest piece and the full Wayang sleeve, he know got an amazing side piece done by Ade. This will be continued later with the Tibetan Bell in the same idea on his other side.

Thanks Martin for all your support so far!

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VAJRA CHEST

Vajra. In Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond. Vajra was also the son of Aniruddha and great grandson of Shri Krishna. As a material device, the vajra is a ritual object, a short metal weapon—originally a kind of fist-iron like Japanese yawara—that has the symbolic nature of a diamond (it can cut any substance but not be cut itself) and that of the thunderbolt (irresistible force).

The vajra is believed to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power. It is a ritual tool or spiritual implement which is symbolically used by Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, all of which are traditions of Dharma. Because of its symbolic importance, the vajra spread along with Indian religion and culture to other parts of Asia. It was used as both a weapon and a symbol in Nepal, India, Tibet, Bhutan, Siam, Cambodia, Myanmar, China, Korea and Japan.

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