Tag Archives: Sleeve

RECENT WORK

Here some of my recent work!

Terima kasih…!
Inspired by Balinese carvings and Batik patterns from middle Java.
One more session for the last checkup…!

Done @sevenseas_tattoos

Inspired by Balinese stone carving. Thank you Nick.

Done @sevenseas_tattoos

– Ade

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

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The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

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Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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BATIK PATTERN MEANINGS – THE PRODIGY NEW MUSIC VIDEO

Kawung

In my work you will often find some returning patterns and shapes on the background. Because I always get inspired by the patterns you can find on the traditional clothing & fabrics from Indonesia and also because they match very well with the other ornaments or images I use, I love to use them in my work.

Those patterns on the fabrics are made by a special dyeing technique called Batik. What many people might not know is that those patterns are not just random patterns, but that they have a much deeper meaning behind them. And that some patterns can only be found in specific areas of Indonesia. Many Indonesian batik patterns are symbolic. For example infants that are carried in batik slings decorated with symbols designed to bring the child luck, and certain batik designs are reserved for brides and bridegrooms, as well as their families. Some designs are reserved for royalties, and even banned to be worn by common people. Even a person’s rank can be determined by the pattern of the batik he or she wears.

Some of the traditional batiks show patterns mixed with images from for example butterflies, birds and other animals. In the end of 16th century, the majority of the Islands in the region of Java had adopted Islamic faith. This change strongly influenced Javanese textile designs as Islam forbids the depiction of humans and animals. This prohibition brought about a variety of stylized and modified ornaments as symbols, such as flowers and geometric patterns, known as Ceplok. The Ceplok patterns were the way in which batik makers attempted to get around the prohibition, creating simple elements which represented animals and people in a non-realistic form.

BATIK KAWUNG

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For example this Batik Kawung, that I used as an inspiration for the tattoo I made shown above. Batik Kawung is one of the oldest batik motifs and is worn by the king and the family. Known in Java since the 13th century, and appears on Hindu temple walls such as the Prambanan. The Kawung pattern symbolizes justice and power.

Batik Kawung pattern has a meaning; symbolizing the hope for human beings that they will always remember their origins. This pattern consists of four circle focused on a point means a King that is assisted by his servants. Actually ‘Kawung’ or ‘Kolang kaling’ is also a name of Palm fruit (Areca Palm blossom) that Indonesian people love to eat.

Part of the Ceplok (circle) family of designs, the Kawung can be arranged as intersecting circles in some of its variations, making dynamic repeated patterns.

 

PARANG RUSAK

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Another example is Batik Parang Rusak. Parang means weapon, literally defective big knife (like a sword). It symbolizes power and strength. Batik with a Parang Rusak pattern is originally worn exclusively by knights and people of authority, this particular batik motif must be processed with serenity and patience. If a mistake is made during the process, it is believed that its magical power will disappear. It’s a traditional batik pattern from a special district of Yogyakarta. The curved lines of a Parang motif portray waves, symbolizing the center of nature’s powers and referring to the king and his powers. There are even more variations of Parang Rusak patterns, such as Parang Rusak Barong, Parang Kusuma, Parang Klitik, Parang Klitik Mentik, etc.

Parang

 

Tattoos all done @ 25 to Life Tattoos in Rotterdam.

 

 

 

NEW MUSIC VIDEO CLIP OF THE PRODIGY – GET YOUR FIGHT ON

How nice it is when one of you’re old customers is texting you telling that you have to check out the new video clip of The Prodigy because the tattoos you made on them are in there. Great! Thanks a lot guys :)

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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SESSION 1 & 2 NIGEL DE JONG BACK PIECE

Nigel_2

 

A while ago I started a new ‘project’, the back piece of dutch pro-footballer (midfielder for Italian Serie A club Milan and the Netherlands national football teamNigel de Jong. After working on his arm, it was now time to continue to the back.

Session 1 & 2 are done, I’m happy with the result so far, but there’s more to come!

Thanks again for the ninja trip! ;)

Nigel

 

To follow the progress of this piece, check out his Instagram account: NDJofficial

 

– Ade Itameda

 

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INHALE – EXHALE

Inhale_Exhale

I’m currently trying out some new sort of calligraphy.

INHALE – EXHALE

Ade_calligraphy

Did this piece recently and I have a lot of other designs ready with this type of calligraphy.

I’m very happy to tattoo more designs like this.!

– Ade Itameda

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BARONG BALI / NIGEL DE JONG

Ade

There’s one thing that we can never say no to and those are these kind of beautiful Indonesian artifacts! Whenever we find a nice Javanese / Balinese mask in the thrift store or find a beautiful Barong statue at a Pasar Malam we háve to take them home. Our little house is slowly turning into an Indonesian museum, but it’s just so much fun to adopt these beautiful items! Above here in the photo you can see on the left, Boma, a Balinese protector/beast. The story tells that once he was a very powerful and destructive earth demon. In the ancient story, Mahabarata, Boma became a great champion and a defender against evil. You can find him above  most doorways, and above the entrance of temples and palaces in Southern Bali, mostly decorated with fresh flowers put behind his ears. His hands spread out to scare off the negative spirits. He’s regarded as being very strong and being able to overcome obstacles physical and mystical. In South Bali, Boma is always depicted with three curls of rock ornaments on top of his head and a bow of flowers. The other mask you see on the right is a Balinese dragon (Naga) wall mask and only used as decoration, to find the exact meaning of this mask is a bit more difficult. He’s part of the many dragon characters found in Bali. In the great story Mahabharata, Nagas are tending towards the negative. They call them “persecutors of all creatures” and tells us “the snakes were of virulent poison, great prowess and excess of strength, and ever bent on biting other creatures”. But at some points within the story, Nagas are important players, frequently no more evil nor deceitful than the other characters in the story and sometimes on the side of good. They mostly show Nagas as having a mix of human and serpent-like habits.

Barong in Bali

It is unclear where the Barong is originated, however it is generally accepted that a barong is a physical manifestation of a protective spirit which guards people from evil influences. In Bali, it dates back to ancient, pre-Hindu times when animism was the most popular form of belief. It is believed that a Barong is powerful enough to guard an entire village with the main task of driving away the demons known in Balinese as Bhuta-kala. Barong come in many different shapes and sizes. Most are representations of animals such as lion-tigers (barong ket), elephants (barong gajah), tigers (barong macan), pigs (barong bangkal), barong sai (Chinese lions), barong buntut (solo/tailless barong), ravens (barong guak), goats (barong kambing), bulls (barong lembu), horses (barong jaran), or moose (barong rusa). Rare Barong are: gaint human puppets called Barong Landung (Landung means tall in Balinese), giant characters called Barong dawang-dawang  or Barong brutuk (in Trunyan). Barong ket are the most commonly seen Barong in ceremonies and tourist performances throughout Bali. Their dance is also the most developed. Most Barong are danced by two dancers, one at the front head piece, the other at the back tail section, giving the creature four feet. The ones with two feet such as Barong tunggal, Barong bangkal and Barong landung are all danced by one single dancer. Barong are decorated with hair or feathers depending on what village they come from. The magical power of the barong is said to be concentrated in its beard, which is customarily made from human hair. The belief in its magical power is so strong that if a village is struck by an epidemic, a priest is ordered to soak the beard in a glass of clean water to make holy water. This holy water is used to bring the village out of the epidemic. For certain ceremonies, many barong will be gathered together to be purified. There is even a temple in Bualu, Nusa Dua named Barong-barong Temple. Barong are magically very special to most Balinese and their powers are taken very seriously.

And after a successful football match last Friday between  Spain vs. The Netherlands we received a nice promotional photo of Nigel de Jong with his healed tattoos by Ade. Follow Nigel on Instagram for more snapshots out of his everyday life! http://www.instragram.com/ndjofficial

Good luck against Australia on Wednesday guys!

– Lielo & Ade Itameda

Nigel_de_Jong_AD

 

 

 

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GODDESS GUAN YIN

Ade_Itameda_1

 

Last week Ade continued to work on this sleeve, this time he added the Goddess on the lower arm called Guan Yin. 

Guan Yin means “Observing the Sounds (or Cries) of the (human) World”. In Chinese Buddhism, Guan Yin is the same as the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (enlightenment being), the highest form of mercy, compassion, kindness & love. Along with Buddhism, Guan Yin was introduced into China as early as the 1st century AD, and slowly reached Japan on the way from Korea and to the other areas of Southeast Asia. Soon after Buddhism was introduced into the country for the first time around the mid-7th century. 

Guan Yin is very often portrayed as a beautiful woman in long, flowing white robes. In her right hand, she holds a jar containing pure, clear water, while her left hand bears the branch of a willow tree. Sometimes, she is accompanied by either two children or two warriors, while other images show her with a bird or astride a dragon. Some ancient depictions of Guan Yin show her dressed as a young girl holding a fish basket, which has probably contributed to her association with fishermen and the sea in certain coastal areas of China. She protects the distressed and hungry, rescues the unfortunate from danger, and gives comfort and aid wherever it is needed. And different then many other, she puts charity to shame, because she will never ask for donations. She had finally attained enlightenment after struggling with non-things. She was just about to enter heaven to join the other buddha’s when she heard the cries of the poor unsaved souls back on Earth. She felt touched and wanted to help and said that she will never rest until every single soul was brought to the world of Buddha’s. As a ‘holy being’ often called to appear in the most unusual and strange situations, she has the ability to transform into any living thing. In fact she’s better known in India as a male. But she often appears in female form to stay incognito. Guan Yin is without a doubt one of the most beloved deities in both religious and folk beliefs in China. Many believe that Guan Yin is the mother of all mankind, an idea that reminds us of the Virgin Mary.

 

 

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ADE X MILAN

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Last week Ade went on a small trip to Milan to continue the ‘project’ he’s working on with Nigel de Jong. Thanks for another great experience!

Milan_2

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STEFAN’S SLEEVE

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ARMS

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