Tag Archives: Ornamental

BACK!

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It’s been a while… We just arrived back in Holland again after an unexpected visit to Indonesia. First of all we want to say thank you for all the people that send an email to make an appointment with Ade to get tattooed in Indonesia. Due to the reason of our visit and the limited amount of time we had this time, Ade didn’t had the opportunity to book everyone in. Ade will save all of your emails and will let you know when he’s planning  to return to Indonesia again. If you didn’t send an email yet and you’re interested in making an appointment with Ade when he returns to Indonesia again, please send your ideas, possible placement and size + reference images to thisis369@gmail.com.

About Ade’s schedule in Holland, we’re currently booking in appointments for the new year. So be quick to book in your app. if you don’t want to wait to long!

Underneath here you can find Ade’s part of the interview with Lars Krutak for the Hungarian Tattoomagazin (http://www.tattoomania.hu/)

 

Ade by Lars Krutak in Hungary

 

 

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STEFAN’S SLEEVE

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BLACK WORK

Photo by Holy Bird.

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BEAUTIFUL BACKS

All tattoos are made by Ade Itameda.

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SINTA

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She is the wife of Rama, the seventh avatāra of Vishnu in the Hindu tradition. Sinta is one of the principal characters in the Ramayana, a Hindu epic named after her husband Rama. Sinta was born in Sitamarhi (Punaura) in Bihar and soon after her birth, taken to Janakpur in present day Nepal by her father, Janaka. She is esteemed as the standard setter for wifely and womanly virtues for all Hindu women. Understood theologically in Hinduism, Sinta is an avatāra of Lakshmi.

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ARM

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ENDLESS KNOT

 

The endless knot has been described as “an ancient symbol representing the interweaving of the Spiritual path, the flowing of Time and Movement within That Which is Eternal. All existence, it says, is bound by time and change, yet ultimately rests serenely within the Divine and the Eternal.”

Various interpretations of the symbol are:

  • The Endless knot iconography symbolised Samsara i.e., the endless cycle of suffering or birth, death and rebirth within Tibetan Buddhism.
  • The inter-twining of wisdom and compassion.
  • Interplay and interaction of the opposing forces in the dualistic world of manifestation, leading to their union, and ultimately to harmony in the universe.
  • The mutual dependence of religious doctrine and secular affairs.
  • The union of wisdom and method.
  • The inseparability of emptiness (shunyata) and dependent origination, the underlying reality of existence.
  • Symbolic of knot symbolism in linking ancestors and omnipresence and the magical ritual and meta-process of binding (refer etymology of Tantra, Yoga and religion)
  • Since the knot has no beginning or end it also symbolizes the wisdom of the Buddha.

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TATTOOS ADE

Aksara jawa lettering and flower inspired by batik ornaments

Aksara jawa:

The earliest known writing in Javanese dates from the 4th Century AD, at which time Javanese was written with the Pallava alphabet. By the 10th Century, the Kawi alphabet, which developed from Pallava, had a distinct Javanese form.

By the 17th Century, the Javanese alphabet, also known as tjarakan or carakan, had developed into its current form. During the Japanese occupation of Indonesia between 1942 and 1945, the alphabet was prohibited.

For a period from the 15th Century onwards, Javanese was also written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, called pégon or gundil.

Since the Dutch introduced the Latin alphabet to Indonesia in the 19th Century, the Javanese alphabet has gradually been supplanted. Today it is used almost exclusively by scholars and for decoration. Those who can read and write it are held in high esteem.

  • Javanese is a syllabic alphabet – each letter has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels can be indicated using a variety of diacritics which appear above, below, in front of or after the main letter.
  • Each consonants has two forms: the aksara form is used at the beginning of a syllable, while the pasangan form, which usually appears below the aksara form, is used for the second consonant of a consonant cluster and mutes the vowel of the aksara.
  • There are a number of special letters called aksara murda or aksara gedhe (great or important letters) which are used for honorific purposes, such as to write the names of respected people.
  • The order of the consonants makes the following saying, “Hana caraka, data sawala padha jayanya, maga bathanga” which means “There were (two) emissaries, they began to fight, their valor was equal, they both fell dead”

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