Tag Archives: Ornament

BALINESE WOOD CARVING

ade_1  ade_3

Ade recently did a couple designs highly inspired on old wood carvings from Bali.

WOODCARVING IN BALI

The craft of woodcarving has never existed in Bali only for decoration purposes.
In the olden days, the fine arts of woodcarving and painting were reserved almost exclusively for royal and religious purposes.
Woodcarving has a very long history in Bali.

bali_5 bali_7

TECHNIQUES

Woodcarving is a skill requiring more precision and sureness than that of carving stone. The carver starts with a clean block of wood which he cuts down to roughly the same size as the piece to be carved. Using very simple tools, the carver lightly taps the highly sharpened instruments. Unlike the technique used in the West, he does not use hand pressure except for really close work. Fine-grained hardwoods such as teak (jati), and strong fruit trees such as jackfruit (nangka), the compact sawo (a beautiful dark red wood), shiny ebony (ebon), tamarind, hibiscus, frangipani, and kayu jepun are the most popular carving woods.

The texture of the grain determines the nature of the piece to be carved. Dark ebony, particularly pieces with striped grain, are best suited for vertical shapes or faces. Rarer are pieces made of unpolished ebony (sanded and brushed only) where you can make out the grain in the wood. The blackest ebony might be used to depict a subject of great dignity. Satinwood, a light striped, beige-colored wood native to Bali, may inspire pieces of a softer theme. The grain often follows a skin pattern or veins in the arms of the statue.

The tradition is, if the statue is not to be gilded or painted it is made smooth with pumice and given a high polish by rubbing it with bamboo. These finished carvings were once treated and stained with oils to achieve a subtle gloss, but now Balinese artisans find that neutral or black shoe polish gives the same result and takes less time.

At the Elephant Cave (Goa Gajah) near Bedulu, Gianyar – elaborate Buddhist style carvings cover the entrance near the cave. This carving dates to 9th Century. Woodcarvings is largely links to religious tradition and  to Pura (small private temples) in Balinese home.

ade_4

Woodcarving for commercial purpose probably started around 1935. The Dutch traders firstly introduce Balinese woodcarving to Europe. Until now, a lot of Dutch Museum still have a huge collection of Balinese woodcarving. The Dutch take-over of Southern Bali in 1906-1908 not only destroyed the traditional courts of the island but it also shattered the old system of art production. There were new types of art showing up, and the artists made works that were commodities instead of items of religious use of content. This has an important impact on the production of carvings which could now be made and sold at tourist spots all around Indonesia.

For the best collections of Balinese wood carving, the visitor should go to the FA Siadja Wood Carving gallery in the village of Mas in Ubud. It holds a wide selection of carving from 1930s to current style worked in many different kind of wood.

– Lielo

Share

NEW T-SHIRTS, TOTE-BAGS & PRINTS 2016

New t-shirts done, inspired by Balinese / Javanese Perada design. Normally Perada is used as decoration in ceremonies in Bali, you can also see it wrapped around temples and is also used in dancer’s costumes. Well this t-shirt is not as cool as the original perada, but ya, sharing culture is always fun.! First will be available at the Mondial du Tattouage convention Paris. and also some available in the shop @25tolifetattoos.

T-shirts available in size S / M / L / XL (only a limited amount of T-shirts available).Preview_t-shirts

Click on photo for bigger preview

 

Prints_2016_final

Click on photo for bigger preview

 

And also 3 different limited (a4 / squared) prints & some awesome tote-bags made by Ade will be available at the Mondial du Tattouage convention Paris.

The convention will start on upcoming Thursday, so see you all there!

– Lielo

 

 

Share

SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

Bali_2

The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Tattoo_Energy

Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

Share

MAYARATIH COUTURE FOR ADE ITAMEDA

 

Last time when we visited Indonesia, Maya Ratih a good friend of us, designed and custom made a batik jacket for Ade. Which he can wear at conventions and formal occasions, something traditional with a modern, more present-day touch. Again thank you for this great gift!

Click on a photo for a bigger preview
Photo’s by Joel Kiel 

 Making of… 

 

 

 

MayaRatih couture

MayaRatih_logo

MayaRatih_profile

Maya works under the name MayaRatih couture  which was established in 2009 and founded by Maya Ratih herself. Besides being a fashion designer, she’s also know for her work as a professional makeup artist.
In 2005 Maya Ratih graduated from ESMOD fashion school of Jakarta and she had few rewards and accolades from her peers and industry professionals during her course; Maya earned experience by working with some well-known designer for couple years. And also she took an additional makeup course at Marta Tilaar and Andiyanto.
Click on a photo for a bigger preview

 

MayaRatih couture focusses on making stunning wedding, evening dresses & gowns. And recently is also offering modern Kebaya, cocktail dresses and men’s suit.
All of their collections are homemade and most of them are custom made especially for each customer; therefore they have a huge selection of high quality fabrics and materials to hand work details of each gown. They are always ensuring that each customer feels special and are empowered to make their dream dress a reality. They always aim for something unusual, something unique. A great combination between the old and the new. Inspired by the traditional Indonesian fabrics and clothing styles, combined in a revolutionary new way.

 

“I believe that fashion is not about what you wear it, but how you wear it, it is form of expansion of one’s identity. I live it. I breathe it. I express it.” – Maya Ratih

 

So if you’re looking for your dream wedding dress or the perfect suit? Something different than the usual? Something designed and custom, handmade only for you? Go check them out!
They occasionally join fashion shows and exhibitions, so go check them out!

 

Sunrise Garden. Jl. Surya Nirmala Blok O No.17A
Jakarta, Indonesia
+62 821 103 10003 / +62 21 9992 5222
mayaratihcouture@yahoo.com
 
– Lielo

Share

TEMPLE GUARDIAN INSPIRED CHEST

 

 

Ade_Itameda_Necklace_Guardian_Bali

Guardians_Temple_Bali

click on photo’s for a bigger view

We’re already two weeks into the new year, time flies! We started fresh, full of new inspiration & energy!

Ade started working on this great chest piece a week ago. The design is inspired on the chest / neck ornaments of the guardians in front of the temples in Bali. First these statues were placed only in Pura (temples) and Puri (Royal homes), but nowadays they can be found in front of most of the houses in Bali. The statues are usually placed as protectors, on the left and right sides of the gate and have an important symbolism for Balinese people. Sometimes they look alike, but they are not identical. Often the statues are like a mirror image rather than an exact replica. For example if one statue makes a looks to the left, the other would make it to the right. Other statues that you can find surrounding temples and houses in Bali are mostly related to Hindu gods (and statues related to Ramayana and Mahabharata).

 

– Lielo

 

 

Share

FEMALE CHEST DESIGN + LATE NIGHT DRAWING

Chest

Click on photo to see a bigger version.

Female chest design Ade did recently. It’s always great to see how an idea, turns into a sketch, a design and eventually into the end result a tattoo, permanently placed on the skin. Sometimes done in one, sometimes in multiple sessions.

Book

Ade has also been working till late at night (always the best moment to draw!) on a traditional batik design for a great project for the next year. We can’t reveal to much about it yet, but you can find out more about it on the International Tattoo Convention in Frankfurt! Another reason to attend this great convention!

 

Share

THANK YOU!

Ade_Itameda_klanten

Last week I received this awesome photo of this super healthy group of friends! Great to see all of your pieces together. And to all of my customers, I want to thank you for your support and trust. Because of you guys I’m able to do what I love the most, creating new artworks. And big or small I love them all!

– Ade Itameda

Ade_Itameda_1

Share

BARONG BALI / NIGEL DE JONG

Ade

There’s one thing that we can never say no to and those are these kind of beautiful Indonesian artifacts! Whenever we find a nice Javanese / Balinese mask in the thrift store or find a beautiful Barong statue at a Pasar Malam we háve to take them home. Our little house is slowly turning into an Indonesian museum, but it’s just so much fun to adopt these beautiful items! Above here in the photo you can see on the left, Boma, a Balinese protector/beast. The story tells that once he was a very powerful and destructive earth demon. In the ancient story, Mahabarata, Boma became a great champion and a defender against evil. You can find him above  most doorways, and above the entrance of temples and palaces in Southern Bali, mostly decorated with fresh flowers put behind his ears. His hands spread out to scare off the negative spirits. He’s regarded as being very strong and being able to overcome obstacles physical and mystical. In South Bali, Boma is always depicted with three curls of rock ornaments on top of his head and a bow of flowers. The other mask you see on the right is a Balinese dragon (Naga) wall mask and only used as decoration, to find the exact meaning of this mask is a bit more difficult. He’s part of the many dragon characters found in Bali. In the great story Mahabharata, Nagas are tending towards the negative. They call them “persecutors of all creatures” and tells us “the snakes were of virulent poison, great prowess and excess of strength, and ever bent on biting other creatures”. But at some points within the story, Nagas are important players, frequently no more evil nor deceitful than the other characters in the story and sometimes on the side of good. They mostly show Nagas as having a mix of human and serpent-like habits.

Barong in Bali

It is unclear where the Barong is originated, however it is generally accepted that a barong is a physical manifestation of a protective spirit which guards people from evil influences. In Bali, it dates back to ancient, pre-Hindu times when animism was the most popular form of belief. It is believed that a Barong is powerful enough to guard an entire village with the main task of driving away the demons known in Balinese as Bhuta-kala. Barong come in many different shapes and sizes. Most are representations of animals such as lion-tigers (barong ket), elephants (barong gajah), tigers (barong macan), pigs (barong bangkal), barong sai (Chinese lions), barong buntut (solo/tailless barong), ravens (barong guak), goats (barong kambing), bulls (barong lembu), horses (barong jaran), or moose (barong rusa). Rare Barong are: gaint human puppets called Barong Landung (Landung means tall in Balinese), giant characters called Barong dawang-dawang  or Barong brutuk (in Trunyan). Barong ket are the most commonly seen Barong in ceremonies and tourist performances throughout Bali. Their dance is also the most developed. Most Barong are danced by two dancers, one at the front head piece, the other at the back tail section, giving the creature four feet. The ones with two feet such as Barong tunggal, Barong bangkal and Barong landung are all danced by one single dancer. Barong are decorated with hair or feathers depending on what village they come from. The magical power of the barong is said to be concentrated in its beard, which is customarily made from human hair. The belief in its magical power is so strong that if a village is struck by an epidemic, a priest is ordered to soak the beard in a glass of clean water to make holy water. This holy water is used to bring the village out of the epidemic. For certain ceremonies, many barong will be gathered together to be purified. There is even a temple in Bualu, Nusa Dua named Barong-barong Temple. Barong are magically very special to most Balinese and their powers are taken very seriously.

And after a successful football match last Friday between  Spain vs. The Netherlands we received a nice promotional photo of Nigel de Jong with his healed tattoos by Ade. Follow Nigel on Instagram for more snapshots out of his everyday life! http://www.instragram.com/ndjofficial

Good luck against Australia on Wednesday guys!

– Lielo & Ade Itameda

Nigel_de_Jong_AD

 

 

 

Share

BACK!

Ade_Itameda_Yenni

It’s been a while… We just arrived back in Holland again after an unexpected visit to Indonesia. First of all we want to say thank you for all the people that send an email to make an appointment with Ade to get tattooed in Indonesia. Due to the reason of our visit and the limited amount of time we had this time, Ade didn’t had the opportunity to book everyone in. Ade will save all of your emails and will let you know when he’s planning  to return to Indonesia again. If you didn’t send an email yet and you’re interested in making an appointment with Ade when he returns to Indonesia again, please send your ideas, possible placement and size + reference images to thisis369@gmail.com.

About Ade’s schedule in Holland, we’re currently booking in appointments for the new year. So be quick to book in your app. if you don’t want to wait to long!

Underneath here you can find Ade’s part of the interview with Lars Krutak for the Hungarian Tattoomagazin (http://www.tattoomania.hu/)

 

Ade by Lars Krutak in Hungary

 

 

Share

RAVEN – BURUNG GAGAK

Last week Ade got a request from a customer to make something slightly different…

Raven

ATTENTION PLEASE! To customers of Ade Itameda; We are currently busy moving to a new place and we still don’t have a working internet connection at the moment, which means that we might reply your emails a bit later then expected! Please be patient we promise we will get back at all of you asap!

Share