Tag Archives: Old

CALLIGRAPHY / MONSTER INK VENRAY

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As I mentioned in the previous post, a while ago when Ade was focussing and learning about ancient scripts, writings and calligraphy and after a lot of try outs, Ade created his own ‘calligraphy’ based and inspired on old, ancient scripts, like Hanacaraka and the Balinese script. He offered a customer to incorporate some of the writing in a tattoo design and after that more people picked it up and followed.

Lately Ade gets a lot of requests about his calligraphy designs. What people not always know is that it’s possible to translate almost every text or sentence into a calligraphy design (as long as it’s not too long). The fact that the ‘calligraphy’ is not always clear to read in one hit, makes it a nice for people who want to get a text done but don’t have the wish that everybody can read it, to make it more personal. To not give away too much of the ‘spirit’ behind these tattoos, if you’re interested you can contact Ade on thisis369@gmail.com for more questions and explanations.

 

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“The Warrior of the Light knows that she has much to be grateful for”

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MONSTER INK TATTOO FEST – VENRAY

 

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And a small reminder; within 2 weeks you can find him on Monster Ink Tattoo Fest in Venray on 08 / 09 October!

Ade still has some free spots available to send him an email for more info -> thisis369@gmail.com

For more info about the convention and which artists are joining check: https://www.facebook.com/Monster.Ink.Tattoo.Fest/

– Lielo

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PARIS TATTOO CONVENTION 2015 – NEW T-SHIRTS

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Only 2 more weeks left before the Mondial du Tatouage – Paris Tattoo Convention on March 6, 7, and 8, 2015. I’m busy preparing the last things before I go, but I can already tell you there will be new limited edition T-shirts for sale! For now only a small preview but the full design will be revealed and for sale at the convention in Paris!

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Secondly, thanks to all the people who send me an email to get tattooed at the Paris convention so far. Drop by at my booth for a chat and to check out my work! Underneath here a small impression of the convention.

 

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And if some people might now I have a big love for antique’s and old items from Indonesia, Tibet and Asia in general. The house is almost getting to small for all the masks, Wayang and woodcarvings I collected so far but last week my eye fell on this old wooden toy bus and I had to take it home. Love it.!

 

– Ade Itameda

 

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Art

GOLD OF THE GODS – WORLDMUSEUM ROTTERDAM

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Last week I saw a news article online that they currently have an exhibition called the Gold of the Gods from Java at the World Art Museum at the harbor of Rotterdam. So that sounded like something we had to see!

– The mysterious world of the Javanese Kingdom remained closed to outsiders for over a thousand years, with only the statues hewn from lava rock at Borobudur displaying the wealth with which the Javanese rulers venerated their gods. The Wereldmuseum is bringing you a world première with its exhibition Gold of the Gods. It is a privilege to show you the most extensive collection of Javanese gold from the seventh to the eleventh centuries on display today, the beauty of which can barely be grasped by contemporary audiences.
On special occasions Javanese royalty would adorn themselves with jewelry originally intended for the gods, in honor of Vishnu, Shiva, and Parvati by embodying them. The jewelry itself was crafted by the most highly renowned goldsmiths, requiring not only superior craftsmanship but also spiritual knowledge as illustrated by the sagas and legends adorning the individual pieces and that portray the active role played by the gods in Javanese society.
The Wereldmuseum is proud to be the first museum in the world to exhibit this collection. Being aware of our tremendous responsibility not only towards the collector, but also with regard to the collection’s history, our aim was to create a presentation that will enable the audience to tangibly perceive the contemporary mysteries surrounding the works on display.
This production was made possible with the cooperation of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum in Leeuwarden, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and, in particular, the National Museum of World Cultures in Amsterdam and Leiden. These museums were willing to lend us several pieces from their permanent collections to enhance our exhibition. Additionally, the Documentation Centre for Ancient Indonesian Art in Amsterdam lent us several photographs of the Borobudur. We are very grateful for these valuable additions to the exhibition.-

 

Yesterday we had a day off and decided to make a trip to the museum in Rotterdam. It turned out to be a very impressive collection of golden jewelry from Java, holding some very exclusive items which we never saw anywhere else before. The set up of the museum is quite simple but classy. You can get really close to the items, exposed in glass showcases  to be able to see the extreme details and complex designs of this ancient jewelry.

Beside the exhibition of the Indonesian gold, there’s a big Tibetan / Japanese section in the museum. Showing a great collection of buddha statues in all different forms and size’s and a great example of a traditional Buddhistic temple. Even the Dalai Lama personally visited the museum in May last year! At the end of the exhibition you will find a gift shop, with a small book section selling a great selection of books about Indonesia,Tibet, batik, keris, wayang, the Pacific, buddhism, etc!

 

Ratu_KidulI was very happy to find this little book about Kanjeng Ratu Kidul by Ruud Greve, The Legend of the South Sea Queen. A Javanese mystery that fascinates me for years already. Soon more about this story on the blog!

Overall it was a nice, educative day out. We would definitely recommend this exhibition / museum to everybody who is interested in ancient jewelry or the Indonesian / Tibetan heritage in general.

You can still visit this exhibition till 6 April 2015.

Entrance: 15,- + free audio tour / CJP: 3,- / free guided tours on every Sunday

 

 

 

 

 

 

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For more information: http://www.wereldmuseum.nl/

 

 

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FLAMMEND HERZ – TATTOO DOCUMENTARY

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Last week a friend came up to us with a documentary made in 2004 named ‘Flammend Herz’ and told us that it was a total must see if you’re interested in some true ‘tattoo history’. And nothing was lied, every tattoo-artist, tattoo-collector and even people who have no particular interest in tattooing should see this documentary!

This German-Swiss documentary tells the story of three of the earliest pioneers in the tattoo-world of Europe. The story of Albert Cornelisse (Rotterdam, 1913), Herbert Hofmann (Freienwalde, 1919) and Karlmann Richter (Kiel, 1913) who shared a great friendship build on their passion of the art of tattooing. In that generation, tattoo’s where mainly worn by sailors, soldiers or abroad criminal circuits. But in the 70’s and later people start getting more and more interested in tattoo’s and getting tattooed. Something still rarely socially accepted, especially at work. This documentary shows a portrait of these three man, who on the first eye look like ordinary elderly man, but underneath their clothes, they are covered in tattoo’s from head till toe. Herbert Hofmann’s tattoo shop in Hamburg St. Pauli was “Germany’s first professional tattoo shop”, is the place where the lives of these men crossed. They all helped Herbert professionally for substantial periods in their lives, but when he decided to pass over the shop to his younger cousin in 1981 the others felt betrayed and their friendship came to an end.

But was this really the end of an intense friendship?

An overall very touching, beautifully filmed documentary which gives you a good insight into the tattoo-world back then and the differences/similarity’s with the tattoo-scene now days. It’s almost hard to believe this documentary is not that known. From the beginning till the end we watched this documentary with a smile on our face, definitely a must see!

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Art

ADE X ART

Made with love

Ade Itameda is currently working on some new artworks. There might be a small exposition of his work later this year! We keep you posted.

For more examples of Ade’s artworks, see our Facebook page!

http://www.facebook.com/thisis369

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TATTOOS ADE

Aksara jawa lettering and flower inspired by batik ornaments

Aksara jawa:

The earliest known writing in Javanese dates from the 4th Century AD, at which time Javanese was written with the Pallava alphabet. By the 10th Century, the Kawi alphabet, which developed from Pallava, had a distinct Javanese form.

By the 17th Century, the Javanese alphabet, also known as tjarakan or carakan, had developed into its current form. During the Japanese occupation of Indonesia between 1942 and 1945, the alphabet was prohibited.

For a period from the 15th Century onwards, Javanese was also written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, called pégon or gundil.

Since the Dutch introduced the Latin alphabet to Indonesia in the 19th Century, the Javanese alphabet has gradually been supplanted. Today it is used almost exclusively by scholars and for decoration. Those who can read and write it are held in high esteem.

  • Javanese is a syllabic alphabet – each letter has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels can be indicated using a variety of diacritics which appear above, below, in front of or after the main letter.
  • Each consonants has two forms: the aksara form is used at the beginning of a syllable, while the pasangan form, which usually appears below the aksara form, is used for the second consonant of a consonant cluster and mutes the vowel of the aksara.
  • There are a number of special letters called aksara murda or aksara gedhe (great or important letters) which are used for honorific purposes, such as to write the names of respected people.
  • The order of the consonants makes the following saying, “Hana caraka, data sawala padha jayanya, maga bathanga” which means “There were (two) emissaries, they began to fight, their valor was equal, they both fell dead”

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