Tag Archives: Man

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Karya ini terinspirasi dari motif yang pertama kali, saya lihat di Solo, dari koleksi batik pak Hartoyo, kedua kali, saya melihatnya dari koleksi @iwantirta_batik.


 

ATTENTION!

Because I’m very busy atm. and I’m running out of time doing tattooing, sketching for new designs, replying customers and focussing on finding new inspiration. No matter how much time I would like to put into it, I simply don’t have enough time to keep the blog up to date.

Thanks a lot everybody for your understanding!

But if you want to stay up to date about my recent work and want to know what I’m currently doing and where I’m working at the moment, please keep an eye on my pages:

http://www.facebook.com/adeitameda

http://www.facebook.com/adeitamedatattoo

https://www.instagram.com/adeitameda/

Soon I will make an important announcement, so stay tuned!

– Ade

 

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RECENT WORK

Some of my recent work.

It’s been great experience to work in this shop so far, if you want to check what we are doing with Kim Anh Nguyen and Jeroen Franken, please follow and share our Facebook page!

Salam budaya..!
Terima kasih…!


Click on the image to go to our FB page

 

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WAYANG KULIT – TOGOG

Togog

Another design that Ade recently made, with another not so well known character of the shadow puppet theatre is Togog. 

Togog is one of the clown servants for the hero of a story in a Wayang play. Some say he is actually Semar’s brother. As you can see Togog has a big lip, this from having tried to swallow a mountain in a battle with Semar about who was the bravest and this is also the reason why he is always stuttering a bit.

Togog_2

Togog was one of the antagonists, always giving advice to be careful of the limits of humanity.
He speaks out to and is always giving corrections, criticisms and suggestions at the annoyance of his master, he remains loyal even though he is sometimes punished for being stupid.
Togog and Bilung (one of the other servants) are joking most of the time and ridicule each other but they reflect wisdom and truth.

Togog_3

– Lielo

 

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

Bali_2

The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Tattoo_Energy

Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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GUNUNGAN SHADOW PUPPET BACK PIECE

Gunungan

Last week Ade stared lining up a big back-piece he will be working on. This time a very special ‘character’ from the wayang kulit shaddow puppet theatre, called Gunungan.

Gunungan_3

GUNUNGAN / KAYON

Gunungan (mountains) or Kayon (tree) / the Cosmic Tree or Mountain of Life is a shadow puppet shaped like a mountain and represents the world and its content. On it you will find carved and painted, mythical symbols and animals. There are two types of Gunungan; on one version you will find the tree standing with his roots in a pond of water, which sometimes contains fish (female qualities) and the other one is one with a big gate guarded by two demon giants. They are the guards of heaven and represent the forces of greed and lust. The gate itself is the gate to heaven or perhaps a gate from the world of reality into the mystical world of the ancestors and the gods. The last one is usually slightly more pointed to represent the male qualities. In the tree you find many animals or fantastic creatures are depicted: a tiger, a bison, peacocks, birds, dragons etc. Resembling concepts such as pride, arrogance, and vanity. Half way up the tree is the big face of an demon, Kala / Raksasa , symbolizing the dangers of human life.

Before the wayang shadow puppet play starts, Gunungan is plugged in the middle of the screen, leaning slightly to the right. This means that the puppet play has not yet begun, like the world that has not yet been ‘opened’. Once the play starts, Gunungan will be moved and lined up on the right. It’s function during the performance is to mark the beginning of each scene.

Gunungan_2

Besides that Gunungan is also used as a sign if there are any chances in the play, the stage or the story. Gunungan is also used to symbolize fire or wind. In this case Gunungan is reversed (flipped around) and on that side it reveals a huge demonic face with its tongue hanging out and eyes bulging. It’s consuming flames and fire. They evil energy is unleashed, it consumes and destroys. It’s energy turned negative.

Gunungan_both_1

 

 

The Gunungan (the cosmic mountain or Tree of Life) has both practical and highly symbolic functions in the wayang performances. For example Gunungan can also be used to symbolize the jungle, a mountain or the ocean during some scenes of the play. In this case Gunungan can act as soil, jungles, streets and so on, following the dialogue of the puppeteer.

 

Gunungan_normal_4Gunungan_fire_1

 

After the play is finished, Gunungan is plugged in again in the middle of the screen, leaning slightly to the left, symbolizing that the story / play has finished.

The Gunungan shadow puppet is not only used in wayang kulit performances but also in wayang golek or klitik shows.

 

Click on the photo’s for a bigger preview!

 

– Lielo

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MAHAKALA X SLICKNICK

 

Mahakala_Joel

Mahakala – protector against negativity

Done last week on our friend, Joel. 

Mahakala is a protector (Dharmapala) and the primary ‘Wisdom Protector’ of Himalayan and Tibetan Buddhism. There are dozens of different variations and forms of Mahakala. But he’s mostly shown in his wrathful appearance.

Mahakala may look frightening, but that’s not meant to make you afraid! Mahakala is the threatening and powerful embodiment of the bodhisattva of compassion. Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have to decided to say ‘no’ to entering paradise in order to help others attain enlightenment. He is always depicted as an extremely fierce and terrifying deity. His purpose is to help to overcome negative obstacles on the path to enlightenment and to protect them on their way to it. The mask of Mahakala is also meant to scare bad spirits and energy away from the place it protects. He is known as a compassionate protector, with all his aggression directed at those who would do harm. His anger is necessary because it gives him the fearsome power to demolish any enemies or obstacles on the way to enlightenment. His face is frightening also to scare away negative thoughts, actions, and energy. Mahakala masks are frequently found in temples and monasteries in Tibet, as well as in private homes as symbols of protection.

The cloud of fire above Mahakala‘s eyes and coming from his mouth represents his powerful energy. His third eye shows his function as a protector; three orbs of vision express his ability to see the past, present and future. Mahakala has a crown of five skulls, which represent the transmutation of five negative afflictions of human nature into virtues. As he confronts negative forces and crushes them with his anger, his crown of skulls neutralizes what remains and works to transform it into something positive. Which means that ignorance becomes wisdom, pride is humbled, attachment becomes the wisdom of discernment, jealously shifts to feeling satisfied with one’s own accomplishments, and anger is released and soothed.

Mahakala

Mahakala is always a protective deity with these features, but he can be portrayed in several different colors:

– Most of the time he is dark blue, which symbolizes the steady and enduring nature of dharma.
– Sometimes he is black; as black absorbs all other colors, so does Mahakala represent ultimate or absolute reality and transcendence of all form.
– Red Mahakala reflects in color his passionate and fiery nature.
– Mahakala in his white form helps one attain riches and a long life.

When you consider Mahakala as your spiritual bodyguard. He appears to be tough and extremely scary, but he is somebody you want to have on your side as you face the trials and obstacles in life!


 

 

25 to Life Tattoos – Slicknick

As some people might already know, Ade recently moved to a different tattoo shop, called 25 to Life Tattoos in Rotterdam.

A bit more information about the other artist/owner of the shop, Nico Mensinga a.k.a Slicknick. Nick who’s the owner of the shop, is a known artist in the tattoo world for over the last 15 years. 10 years ago he opened his own tattoo studio at the Pannekoekstraat in Rotterdam. Nico is mostly known for his solid and clean old school and Japanese work, he’s the right guy if you’re looking for a real traditional and unique tattoo design. You definitly have to go and check out more of his great work on his FB page!

For more information about the shop and the artists, Slicknick & Ade Itameda you can find on the 25 to Life Tattoos Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/25ToLifeTattoos And keep an eye on this Facebook page because soon there will be two other artists working in the shop, Dickie de Wit, known for his old school work, will regularly start taking a spot on Thursday’s and the Japanese tattoo artist, Horishachi Osaka is coming to Europe again and will be doing a guest-spot at the shop from the 9th till 13th of september. He’s known for his traditional Tebori-style of tattooing. Send an email to make an appointment with all relevant information to: slicknick@hetnet.nl 

So drop by at this great shop in the heart of Rotterdam and come by to make an appointment or to check out their portfolio’s!

 

– Lielo

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KRIS / KERIS ON LEG

Keris

The Kris or Keris is a Javanese asymmetrical dagger most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia or Javanese culture. In Indonesia, people believe that the Krises have magical powers.

The earliest Krises known were made around 1360 AD and most probably spread from the island of throughout Southeast Asia. Krises have been produced in many different places in Indonesia for centuries, but the Kris is mostly used, worshiped and seen in ceremonies in Central Java (besides the regular use in ceremonies of Krises in Bali).  As the result, in Indonesia Krises are commonly associated with the Javanese culture, although other ethnicities such as Balinese, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar and Malay people are also very familiar with the weapon as part of their culture. The Kris is most known for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well. A Kris can be divided into three parts: bilah (blade), hulu (hilt), and warangka (sheath). These parts of the Kris are often carved into extreme detail and made from various materials like metal, precious or rare types of wood, gold or ivory. They are art objects on their own. Some blades can be made in a relatively short time, while some weapons take years to complete.

The dhapur (the form and design of the blade, has around 150 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, has around 60 variants), and tangguh is referring to the age and origin of a Kris. Depending on the quality and historical value of the Kris, the value in money can go up to thousands of dollars or more. Both used a weapon and as a spiritual object, Krises are often considered to possess magical powers, with some blades seen as holders for good luck and others holding the bad. Krises are also often used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, as extra equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for a ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, and as a symbol of heroism, etc.

Krises are made by a Kris blacksmith called, empu. Before the empu starts making the Kris, he will first have a conversation with the client to make sure the Kris will be adapted to the exact wishes of the future owner. Empu are highly respected craftsmen with additional knowledge in literature, history, the occult, etc. By performing specific rituals before, during and after the process of forging the Kris, it will give the Kris his energetic load. Because a Kris is always made specifically for one person, it could be that a Kris of someone else is not ‘a good match’ for you. That doesn’t mean the Kris is ‘bad or wrong’, but it doesn’t fit the person. Krises need to be washed and ‘reloaded’ every once in a while, this comes with a very complex and sometimes even dangerous ritual of washing, drying and oil. Dangerous because some people try to use Arsenic, to make the pamor show up better. After washing the Kris, incense is being used to dry the blade and after that treated with oil. Krises are always highly cherished and taken care of to preserve their magical powers. 

Until the 1990s, Kris-making activities in Java had almost come to a standstill due to economic difficulties and changing socio-cultural values. Over the past three decades, Krises have lost their prominent social and spiritual meaning in society. Only a handful active and respected empus still produce high quality Krises in the traditional way but their number is dramatically decreasing and it’s getting more difficult to find them.

– Ade Itameda

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VIDEO – WAYANG ARJUNA

 

Arjuna

WAYANG ARJUNA

This is a tattoo Ade made a while ago on one of his customers.

A little background information; Arjuna is one of the most known characters of the traditional Wayang shadow plays in the world. Arjuna is the third of the five Pandava brothers from the Mahabharata story. He is a master archer and considered to be the hero of the battle of Kurukshetra (a historical and religious important land in India, 3200 B.C.), a fight between the Pandavas and the Kauravas (2 princes). Before the battle starts, Krishna (the 8th incarnation of Lord Vishnu in Hinduism) teaches the warrior Arjuna that it’s not about land and power but all about the human spirit. Arjuna is the only hero in the Mahabharata story that was undefeated. A bit more about his character; Arjuna is described as the one whose mind is spotless and clean of all impurities. even describes Arjuna as Anagha, which means pure of heart or sinless. He was a very handsome, gentle, loyal but also a fearless man. He had strong magical powers which he developed in the time he lived as a prince in the palace. In that time he also studied things such as literature and philosophy, beside the knowledge of battle and war. He was loved by many and was known for his many love affairs. But like many heroes, Arjuna is not much of a family man: he has the habit to go off on his own looking for action.

 

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INDONESIAN ROOTS

First of all: Happy new year! We hope 2013 will be a great, healthy and creative year for all of you!

Recently we had some customers coming in who wanted to have a designs done which are resembling  their Indonesian roots. Some of them have Indonesian fathers, mothers, grandmothers, aunties or other family members. And even in some cases we have people contacting us who don’t have a connection with Indonesia because of their family but just because they have a particular interest in the culture, history or traditions. It’s always great to hear the stories and reasons about why someone wants to get a specific design tattooed. In this way we can keep ancient symbols and images alive and pass it on to the next generations.

 

Javanese Mask.

Javanese Mask.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

 

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

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THAI NAGA HALF SLEEVE

Glen_1

Nāga themed half sleeve on left arm. 

Garuda themed half sleeve on right arm.

This is the result of a great project about the ancient characters Garuda & Naga. Showing above is the left arm with the Naga theme. The right arm is posted on this blog before and has a Garuda theme. This was a quite challenging project for me because I never drew a dragon before in my life. This is my first dragon, sounds weird, but it’s true. We choose to use the Thai dragon called Naga and surrounded it with Thai ornaments based on traditional Thai carvings. The customer wanted to have a contrast between the left arm and the right arm. To learn more about the Thai dragons I had to find some books telling me a little bit more of the stories behind these ancient characters. I found out these stories are incredibly complicated. Both of these characters appear in as well Buddhism and Hinduism mythology. I focussed on the Buddism interpetation of the Garuda (Even the stories about Garuda of Hinduism & Buddhism have similarities). I’m always amazed about the Thai ornaments and carvings found on temples and houses. Great piece to work on! More of this!

– Ade Itameda

A little bit more about Garuda & Nāga:

In Buddhist mythology, the Garuda are enormous predatory birds with intelligence and social organization. Another name for the Garuda is Suparṇa which means “well-winged, having good wings”. Like the Nāga, they combine the characteristics of animals and divine beings. They don’t know the exact size of the Garuda, but they say that his wings have a span of many ‘miles’ wide. They also say that when a Garuda’s wings flap, they create hurricane-like winds that darken the sky and blow down houses. A human being is so small compared to a Garuda that a man can hide in the plumage of one without being noticed. They are also capable of tearing up entire banyan trees from their roots and carrying them off. They also have the ability to grow large or small, and to appear and disappear at will. The Garuda have kings and cities and at least some of them have the magical power of changing into human form when they wish to have dealings with people.

The Garuda are enemies to the Nāga, a race of intelligent serpent or dragon-like beings, whom they hunt. The Garuda at one time caught the Nāga by seizing them by their heads; but the Nāga learned that by swallowing large stones, they could make themselves too heavy to be carried by the Garuda, wearing them out and killing them from exhaustion. The Buddhist Nāga generally has the form of a great cobra-like snake, usually with a single head but sometimes with many. At least some of the Nāga are capable of using magic powers to transform themselves to look human just like Garuda. In Buddhist painting, the Nāga is sometimes portrayed as a human being with a snake or dragon extending over his head. They believe that Nāga live on Mount Sumeru, among the other minor deities, and in various parts of the human-inhabited earth. Some of them are live in the water, in streams or lakes and others are living in the earth, in underground caverns.

As you might know, the Mekong is one of the longest rivers in Southeast Asia. The legend of the Nāga is a strong and sacred belief held by Thai and Lao people living along this river. Many pay their respects to the river because they believe the Nāga still rule in it, and locals hold an annual sacrifice for the Nāga. Each ceremony depends on how each village earns its living from the Mekong River. For instance, through fishing or transport. Local residents believe that the Nāga can protect them from danger, so they are likely to make a sacrifice to Nāga before taking a boat trip along the Mekong River.

 

All these tattoo designs are custom made by Ade Itameda and created uniquely for each client and made by modern tattoo machines. They are based on personal ideas/symbols of his clients.  None of these designs will be re-used again. 

Copyright © Ade Itameda 2012. All rights reserved.

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