Tag Archives: Mahabharata

WAYANG KULIT – BIMA

Bima

After the Tattoo Convention Rotterdam 2016 (thanks everyone for dropping by!), last week Ade worked on an upper arm design inspired by a figure found in Wayang Kulit.

BIMA

Bima_2

 

Bima is the second of the Pandawa (Pandava) brothers and a leading character in the epic Mahabharata. He is a strong and bold character as reflected in his round eyes and wide
stance. He was surrounded by a whirlwind wherever he went and he is also instantly recognisable by his long fingernails that act as his weapon (Pancanaka).

He is seen as a heroic figure and known as a powerful figure, he is always rude and intimidating for the enemy, even though his heart soft. Bima characteristics are brave, steadfast, strong, stoic, obedient and honest, and he considers all people equal. He never curses or sits in front of a person he talks to. He has three wives and three children. Having descended from the wind god Vayu, Bima has the ability to fly, as does his half-brother Hanuman (Hanoman) and his son Ghatotkacha.

The vast majority of the ‘Wayang’ plays performed are drawn from the two great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata with as well as stories of Javanese origin. ‘Wayang kulit’ is considered as the highest of the Javanese performing arts. Performed in the royal courts of Java as early as the ninth century, this tradition continues to be treasured as one of the ‘pusaka’ or sacred heirlooms of the court. ‘Wayang kulit’ is traditionally performed on ritual days and religious ceremonies. It has also been adapted more recently for television and public education campaigns.

Here a nice example of some Wayang kulit play showing the character Bima.

Video by Antonius Oktaviano Wiriadjaja

 

Next thing is: Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2016! See you there!

– Lielo

 

 

 

 

 

Share

TEMPLE GUARDIAN INSPIRED CHEST

 

 

Ade_Itameda_Necklace_Guardian_Bali

Guardians_Temple_Bali

click on photo’s for a bigger view

We’re already two weeks into the new year, time flies! We started fresh, full of new inspiration & energy!

Ade started working on this great chest piece a week ago. The design is inspired on the chest / neck ornaments of the guardians in front of the temples in Bali. First these statues were placed only in Pura (temples) and Puri (Royal homes), but nowadays they can be found in front of most of the houses in Bali. The statues are usually placed as protectors, on the left and right sides of the gate and have an important symbolism for Balinese people. Sometimes they look alike, but they are not identical. Often the statues are like a mirror image rather than an exact replica. For example if one statue makes a looks to the left, the other would make it to the right. Other statues that you can find surrounding temples and houses in Bali are mostly related to Hindu gods (and statues related to Ramayana and Mahabharata).

 

– Lielo

 

 

Share

VIDEO – WAYANG ARJUNA

 

Arjuna

WAYANG ARJUNA

This is a tattoo Ade made a while ago on one of his customers.

A little background information; Arjuna is one of the most known characters of the traditional Wayang shadow plays in the world. Arjuna is the third of the five Pandava brothers from the Mahabharata story. He is a master archer and considered to be the hero of the battle of Kurukshetra (a historical and religious important land in India, 3200 B.C.), a fight between the Pandavas and the Kauravas (2 princes). Before the battle starts, Krishna (the 8th incarnation of Lord Vishnu in Hinduism) teaches the warrior Arjuna that it’s not about land and power but all about the human spirit. Arjuna is the only hero in the Mahabharata story that was undefeated. A bit more about his character; Arjuna is described as the one whose mind is spotless and clean of all impurities. even describes Arjuna as Anagha, which means pure of heart or sinless. He was a very handsome, gentle, loyal but also a fearless man. He had strong magical powers which he developed in the time he lived as a prince in the palace. In that time he also studied things such as literature and philosophy, beside the knowledge of battle and war. He was loved by many and was known for his many love affairs. But like many heroes, Arjuna is not much of a family man: he has the habit to go off on his own looking for action.

 

Share

GANESHA

 

Ganesha_Aida

 

A while ago Ade finished a back-piece on Michelle. To explain the meaning of the Ganesha in one sentence is technically seen impossible. The story behind ‘Lord Ganesh’, the famous Hindu Elephant God, is so complex that there’s not only one way of explaining it.

I will try to tell you a little bit more about this famous religious figure, found mostly in India. Ganesha, also called Ganesh or Ganapanti Tantra is seen as the biggest deity of Hinduism, a deity with a head of a elephant. He is the God of wisdom and knowledge, takes away obstacles in life and he is the protector of travellers. Hindu’s pray to Ganesha before they start something new, like a new job or moving out to a new house. Ganesha is the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is mostly portrayed with and mouse or a rat, named Mushika, as his ‘Vahana’ (vehicle).

When Ganesh was still very young, he wanted to be left alone and preferred to spend his time wandering around by himself. Because of that reason and because of the fact that Shiva had started a war, Shiva never had the opportunity to really get to know his son. After years and years of battle’s Shiva returned to Parvati and Ganesh. When he arrived at the house he saw an intruder. And because he was so incredibly sanguineous he instantly decapitated the intruder. But he didn’t see that the intruder was  actually his own son! He didn’t recognize Ganesh on the first sight because Shiva never really been close to him. Because Shiva felt devastated  he commended his servants to bring him the head of the first creature they would see alive. After a short period of time they returned with the cut-off head of an elephant. Shiva put the head of the elephant on the lifeless body of his son and Ganesha directly rose from the death and entered history as a half-god with the head of an elephant.

There are many different appearances of Ganesh, every time shown with different attributes. In the case of this tattoo, a key (client’s wish), a lotus and a plate with candy. Mostly Ganesha is portrayed with a big, bare belly and a rose-orange skin, a rat sitting next to his feet and off course an elephant head. Sometimes Ganesha has an symbol between his eye’s and trunk which looks like the number ‘3’, similar to the symbol of Om or Aum; the sound of the vibration out of which the universe was created.

Ganesha is also seen as the one who wrote down the Mahabharata (One of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India). And anywhere in India you will find statues of him which they believe will help travellers to make the decision which way they need to go. Ganesha is always symbolizing the start of something, the first impulse.

 

 

Share