Tag Archives: Keris

NEW PATH

It’s been a while since I posted something here. As some of you might already know, quite some things have changed. After 7 great years living and working in The Netherlands, I recently moved back to my home country, Indonesia. So much I have learned in these years, so many nice memories made and many great tattoo projects I worked on. I can’t thank you, all my customers, enough for their interest in my work and their loyalty. All the good conversations and laughs we had and your endless support.

Now it’s time for a new path I’m taking and making a dream come true. I will use this blog to keep you up to date about the things that I will be working on here in Indonesia, and some new project that I’m working on.

At the moment I’m working in Bali, Indonesia, which will be my base for the upcoming months after that. In the beginning of the new year, my plan is to visit The Netherlands again for a short moment.

On my Instagram account you will find all my recent updates about my work and when and where I will be at that moment.

Thank you all again to check out my blog. Let’s do this, keep on moving and don’t die.!

More coming soon!

❈ Ade Itameda

Share

MONDIAL DU TATOUAGE PARIS 2016

Mondial_1

Click on photo’s for a bigger preview.

 

Thank you to all my customers, anyone who came by my booth and off course a big thank you to Tin Tin Tatouages and the organization of Mondial du Tattouage for letting me join this amazing convention. Amazing atmosphere, good organization, great artists & friends. I had a great time.! See you again next year Thumbs

Mondial_11

Mondial_13

Mondial_10

Photo by soulhandcuffed.

 

A nice after movie of the convention.

– Ade Itameda

 

 

Share
Art

GOLD OF THE GODS – WORLDMUSEUM ROTTERDAM

Gold_of_the_Gods

 

Last week I saw a news article online that they currently have an exhibition called the Gold of the Gods from Java at the World Art Museum at the harbor of Rotterdam. So that sounded like something we had to see!

– The mysterious world of the Javanese Kingdom remained closed to outsiders for over a thousand years, with only the statues hewn from lava rock at Borobudur displaying the wealth with which the Javanese rulers venerated their gods. The Wereldmuseum is bringing you a world première with its exhibition Gold of the Gods. It is a privilege to show you the most extensive collection of Javanese gold from the seventh to the eleventh centuries on display today, the beauty of which can barely be grasped by contemporary audiences.
On special occasions Javanese royalty would adorn themselves with jewelry originally intended for the gods, in honor of Vishnu, Shiva, and Parvati by embodying them. The jewelry itself was crafted by the most highly renowned goldsmiths, requiring not only superior craftsmanship but also spiritual knowledge as illustrated by the sagas and legends adorning the individual pieces and that portray the active role played by the gods in Javanese society.
The Wereldmuseum is proud to be the first museum in the world to exhibit this collection. Being aware of our tremendous responsibility not only towards the collector, but also with regard to the collection’s history, our aim was to create a presentation that will enable the audience to tangibly perceive the contemporary mysteries surrounding the works on display.
This production was made possible with the cooperation of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum in Leeuwarden, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and, in particular, the National Museum of World Cultures in Amsterdam and Leiden. These museums were willing to lend us several pieces from their permanent collections to enhance our exhibition. Additionally, the Documentation Centre for Ancient Indonesian Art in Amsterdam lent us several photographs of the Borobudur. We are very grateful for these valuable additions to the exhibition.-

 

Yesterday we had a day off and decided to make a trip to the museum in Rotterdam. It turned out to be a very impressive collection of golden jewelry from Java, holding some very exclusive items which we never saw anywhere else before. The set up of the museum is quite simple but classy. You can get really close to the items, exposed in glass showcases  to be able to see the extreme details and complex designs of this ancient jewelry.

Beside the exhibition of the Indonesian gold, there’s a big Tibetan / Japanese section in the museum. Showing a great collection of buddha statues in all different forms and size’s and a great example of a traditional Buddhistic temple. Even the Dalai Lama personally visited the museum in May last year! At the end of the exhibition you will find a gift shop, with a small book section selling a great selection of books about Indonesia,Tibet, batik, keris, wayang, the Pacific, buddhism, etc!

 

Ratu_KidulI was very happy to find this little book about Kanjeng Ratu Kidul by Ruud Greve, The Legend of the South Sea Queen. A Javanese mystery that fascinates me for years already. Soon more about this story on the blog!

Overall it was a nice, educative day out. We would definitely recommend this exhibition / museum to everybody who is interested in ancient jewelry or the Indonesian / Tibetan heritage in general.

You can still visit this exhibition till 6 April 2015.

Entrance: 15,- + free audio tour / CJP: 3,- / free guided tours on every Sunday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold_of_the_Gods_8

 

For more information: http://www.wereldmuseum.nl/

 

 

Share

KRIS / KERIS ON LEG

Keris

The Kris or Keris is a Javanese asymmetrical dagger most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia or Javanese culture. In Indonesia, people believe that the Krises have magical powers.

The earliest Krises known were made around 1360 AD and most probably spread from the island of throughout Southeast Asia. Krises have been produced in many different places in Indonesia for centuries, but the Kris is mostly used, worshiped and seen in ceremonies in Central Java (besides the regular use in ceremonies of Krises in Bali).  As the result, in Indonesia Krises are commonly associated with the Javanese culture, although other ethnicities such as Balinese, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar and Malay people are also very familiar with the weapon as part of their culture. The Kris is most known for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well. A Kris can be divided into three parts: bilah (blade), hulu (hilt), and warangka (sheath). These parts of the Kris are often carved into extreme detail and made from various materials like metal, precious or rare types of wood, gold or ivory. They are art objects on their own. Some blades can be made in a relatively short time, while some weapons take years to complete.

The dhapur (the form and design of the blade, has around 150 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, has around 60 variants), and tangguh is referring to the age and origin of a Kris. Depending on the quality and historical value of the Kris, the value in money can go up to thousands of dollars or more. Both used a weapon and as a spiritual object, Krises are often considered to possess magical powers, with some blades seen as holders for good luck and others holding the bad. Krises are also often used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, as extra equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for a ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, and as a symbol of heroism, etc.

Krises are made by a Kris blacksmith called, empu. Before the empu starts making the Kris, he will first have a conversation with the client to make sure the Kris will be adapted to the exact wishes of the future owner. Empu are highly respected craftsmen with additional knowledge in literature, history, the occult, etc. By performing specific rituals before, during and after the process of forging the Kris, it will give the Kris his energetic load. Because a Kris is always made specifically for one person, it could be that a Kris of someone else is not ‘a good match’ for you. That doesn’t mean the Kris is ‘bad or wrong’, but it doesn’t fit the person. Krises need to be washed and ‘reloaded’ every once in a while, this comes with a very complex and sometimes even dangerous ritual of washing, drying and oil. Dangerous because some people try to use Arsenic, to make the pamor show up better. After washing the Kris, incense is being used to dry the blade and after that treated with oil. Krises are always highly cherished and taken care of to preserve their magical powers. 

Until the 1990s, Kris-making activities in Java had almost come to a standstill due to economic difficulties and changing socio-cultural values. Over the past three decades, Krises have lost their prominent social and spiritual meaning in society. Only a handful active and respected empus still produce high quality Krises in the traditional way but their number is dramatically decreasing and it’s getting more difficult to find them.

– Ade Itameda

Share

ADE ITAMEDA X OLIVIER

Hanuman_1

Last week a plan that was made years ago was finally executed. Olivier,  a long term friend and fellow tattoo-artist, came with the idea of a collaboration between him and Ade around 3 years ago, when both of the guys where still working in Rock’n Roll Tattoo studio in Jakarta. Because of all the travelling they never found a good moment to work it out. But last week, Olivier came up with a nice sketch of a wayang shadow puppet version of ‘Hanuman‘ pierced by a traditional Indonesian keris. Ade made a couple of adjustments and then it was ready!

 

Share

PHOTO’S EINDHOVEN TATTOO CONVENTION

 

Here is a small photo report of the Eindhoven Tattoo Convention.

All photo’s made by 2XWORKS.

Tattoo Convention Eindhoven 9

 

Share

NEW T-SHIRTS!

 

Mask

Design by Ade Itameda.

Inspired by Javanese masks, used during traditional dances. Underneath the mask there’s 2 keris. Keris are, both a weapon and spiritual object, keris are often considered to have an essence or presence, with some blades possessing good luck and others possessing bad. Salam Budaya means ‘Greeting Culture’.

Printed in a matte, detailed print,
on a black, made of 100% cotton, high-quality t-shirt.

Available in size M, L, XL, XXL.

Model is wearing L.

25,- euro (excl. shipping costs).

 

Batik Flower

Design by Ade Itameda.

Based on flowers used in the traditional, Batik fabrics from Indonesia. In the middle there’s the AUM symbol surrounded by a Bali flower, often used in holy ceremonies. Salam Budaya means ‘Greeting Culture’.

Printed in a matte, detailed print,
on a black, made of 100% cotton, high-quality t-shirt.
Special hand-cut model, with cute short sleeves. Low feminine neck. Long fit.

Available in size S, M, L, and XL.

Model is wearing M.

25,- euro (excl. shipping costs).

You can send your order to: thisis369@gmail.com
Please include in your email the preferred size, name, and address.

(We’re shipping to every country, it depends on the country what the sending costs will be).

We will send you information about payment and the shipping costs for your order.

We would like to keep our items exclusive and limited.
There are only 24 t-shirts printed with this design! 

So be quick, and place your order!

Machine wash cold. Wash dark colors separately. Use non-chlorine bleach only if needed. Tumble dry low. Do not iron decoration. Do not dry clean if decorated. The t-shirts are made of 100% cotton so expect some shrinkage. To lessen this, try hang drying your t-shirts.

Share

SKETCHING

Because the last t-shirts we made where a big succes, we decided to design some new ones.

We’re still busy sketching for the new t-shirts, but here’s a little sneak preview of the t-shirt design for the man! The design for the woman t-shirts will follow soon. We can’t tell you allot of details about the new designs, because we want to keep it as a suprise.These t-shirts will be limited again to a total amount of 24 t-shirts per design, and will not be reprinted again.

Soon we will show the new designs, you just need to be a little bit more patient!

We can also announce that Lielo will be selling framed prints of her photo’s. More details will follow soon!

Share