Tag Archives: Java

WAYANG ARJUNA SIDE PIECE

As you might have seen on my Facebook, I’m currently in Indonesia for a small break and visiting my family. This is a piece I made last week during my stay in Jakarta.

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Thank you/ terima kasih Adit.! Inspired by wayang (shadow puppets) Arjuna from Java Indonesia. To read more about Arjuna see another piece i’ve done here -> http://www.thisis369.com/blog/?p=2187
Done Jakarta / Indonesia.

I will return to The Netherlands around the end of August. I know a lot of people are still waiting for a reply from me on their email, thanks in advance for your patience!

About my schedule for the upcoming months in the shop, Seven Seas  in Eindhoven (discussion dates / appointments). I will start setting up a new schedule for the upcoming months around the the beginning of September.  I’m currently working with somewhat of a waiting list, if I’m interested in taking your request, I will send you a personal reply with further information. Please note that; those that have all that info in their initial email generally get booked first. If you haven’t added this info, do it now and add it as a reply to the email you originally sent. I’m easily confused, so a continuing thread is much easier.
Due to the amount of messages I get a day, I’m not able to respond right now. And as I handle all of this personally and it takes a long time to work my way through them between drawing and tattooing.

Please do not send multiple emails! (I don’t take any requests by Instagram / Facebook)

Thanks! See you guys soon again in The Netherlands!

– Ade

 

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WAYANG KULIT – BIMA

Bima

After the Tattoo Convention Rotterdam 2016 (thanks everyone for dropping by!), last week Ade worked on an upper arm design inspired by a figure found in Wayang Kulit.

BIMA

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Bima is the second of the Pandawa (Pandava) brothers and a leading character in the epic Mahabharata. He is a strong and bold character as reflected in his round eyes and wide
stance. He was surrounded by a whirlwind wherever he went and he is also instantly recognisable by his long fingernails that act as his weapon (Pancanaka).

He is seen as a heroic figure and known as a powerful figure, he is always rude and intimidating for the enemy, even though his heart soft. Bima characteristics are brave, steadfast, strong, stoic, obedient and honest, and he considers all people equal. He never curses or sits in front of a person he talks to. He has three wives and three children. Having descended from the wind god Vayu, Bima has the ability to fly, as does his half-brother Hanuman (Hanoman) and his son Ghatotkacha.

The vast majority of the ‘Wayang’ plays performed are drawn from the two great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata with as well as stories of Javanese origin. ‘Wayang kulit’ is considered as the highest of the Javanese performing arts. Performed in the royal courts of Java as early as the ninth century, this tradition continues to be treasured as one of the ‘pusaka’ or sacred heirlooms of the court. ‘Wayang kulit’ is traditionally performed on ritual days and religious ceremonies. It has also been adapted more recently for television and public education campaigns.

Here a nice example of some Wayang kulit play showing the character Bima.

Video by Antonius Oktaviano Wiriadjaja

 

Next thing is: Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2016! See you there!

– Lielo

 

 

 

 

 

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BATIK PATTERN MEANINGS – THE PRODIGY NEW MUSIC VIDEO

Kawung

In my work you will often find some returning patterns and shapes on the background. Because I always get inspired by the patterns you can find on the traditional clothing & fabrics from Indonesia and also because they match very well with the other ornaments or images I use, I love to use them in my work.

Those patterns on the fabrics are made by a special dyeing technique called Batik. What many people might not know is that those patterns are not just random patterns, but that they have a much deeper meaning behind them. And that some patterns can only be found in specific areas of Indonesia. Many Indonesian batik patterns are symbolic. For example infants that are carried in batik slings decorated with symbols designed to bring the child luck, and certain batik designs are reserved for brides and bridegrooms, as well as their families. Some designs are reserved for royalties, and even banned to be worn by common people. Even a person’s rank can be determined by the pattern of the batik he or she wears.

Some of the traditional batiks show patterns mixed with images from for example butterflies, birds and other animals. In the end of 16th century, the majority of the Islands in the region of Java had adopted Islamic faith. This change strongly influenced Javanese textile designs as Islam forbids the depiction of humans and animals. This prohibition brought about a variety of stylized and modified ornaments as symbols, such as flowers and geometric patterns, known as Ceplok. The Ceplok patterns were the way in which batik makers attempted to get around the prohibition, creating simple elements which represented animals and people in a non-realistic form.

BATIK KAWUNG

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For example this Batik Kawung, that I used as an inspiration for the tattoo I made shown above. Batik Kawung is one of the oldest batik motifs and is worn by the king and the family. Known in Java since the 13th century, and appears on Hindu temple walls such as the Prambanan. The Kawung pattern symbolizes justice and power.

Batik Kawung pattern has a meaning; symbolizing the hope for human beings that they will always remember their origins. This pattern consists of four circle focused on a point means a King that is assisted by his servants. Actually ‘Kawung’ or ‘Kolang kaling’ is also a name of Palm fruit (Areca Palm blossom) that Indonesian people love to eat.

Part of the Ceplok (circle) family of designs, the Kawung can be arranged as intersecting circles in some of its variations, making dynamic repeated patterns.

 

PARANG RUSAK

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Another example is Batik Parang Rusak. Parang means weapon, literally defective big knife (like a sword). It symbolizes power and strength. Batik with a Parang Rusak pattern is originally worn exclusively by knights and people of authority, this particular batik motif must be processed with serenity and patience. If a mistake is made during the process, it is believed that its magical power will disappear. It’s a traditional batik pattern from a special district of Yogyakarta. The curved lines of a Parang motif portray waves, symbolizing the center of nature’s powers and referring to the king and his powers. There are even more variations of Parang Rusak patterns, such as Parang Rusak Barong, Parang Kusuma, Parang Klitik, Parang Klitik Mentik, etc.

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Tattoos all done @ 25 to Life Tattoos in Rotterdam.

 

 

 

NEW MUSIC VIDEO CLIP OF THE PRODIGY – GET YOUR FIGHT ON

How nice it is when one of you’re old customers is texting you telling that you have to check out the new video clip of The Prodigy because the tattoos you made on them are in there. Great! Thanks a lot guys :)

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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LEGEND OF RATU KIDUL – QUEEN OF THE SOUTHERN SEA OF JAVA

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In the last days I finally found some time to study more about Ratu Kidul, the queen of the Southern Sea of Java. A legend from Indonesia that fascinates me already for over years. Because it’s such a known and ancient legend and there’s many different stories going around about her in Indonesia, I decided to stick to the stories and the place that’s the most familiar to me.

5 years ago I heard about this old mysterious story for the first time during my visit to Parang Tritis, an area on the southern coast of Java in the Bantul Regency, about 30 km south of Yogyakarta. When I arrived at the Hotel Queen of the South – Puri Ratu Kidul for some drinks, we decided to take the big climb down the cliff to walk on the beach.

Before I tried to climb down my friends directly stopped me and checked me if I was not accidentally wearing any green or blue clothing. Kinda surprised I asked them, if that would be a problem? They told me ‘Because otherwise the Queen of the South Sea will get angry and will drag you into the sea and make you serve like her slave!‘ Wow, that kinda shocked me and I instantly wanted to know more about this mysterious lady!

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Kanjeng Ratu Kidul 

She is a legendary Indonesian female spirit or deity, known as the Queen of the Southern Sea of Java (Indian Ocean or Samudra Kidul south of Java island) in Javanese and Sundanese mythology. The origin of these stories is hard to find but could go back to around the year 1300, more then 700 years ago.

She goes under many names which reflect the diverse stories of her origin in a lot of sagas, legends, myths and traditional folklore. Other names include, Nyai Roro Kidul, Ratu Laut SelatanGusti Kanjeng Ratu Kidul, Kanjeng Ratu Ayu Kencono Sari etc. In this post I stick to the name that I know out of my own experience, Ratu Kidul. 

If she has to be seen as a goddess or more as a ghost depends a bit on religious beliefs. For example in the Islamic society of Indonesia, she’s more seen as a ghost who is immortal. And in Bali they more see her as an appearance of Durga, so in their eyes, she is seen as a goddess. And according to Javanese beliefs, she is also the mythical spiritual consort and protector of the Sultans of Mataram and Yogyakarta, beginning with Senopati and continuing to the present day.

She is often illustrated as a mermaid with a tail as well the lower part of the body of a snake or a fish. They say she claimed to take the soul of any who she wished for. And the local people believe that the Queen often claims lives of fishermen or visitors that bathe on the beach and that she usually prefers handsome young men. Anybody who respects her and brings her offerings she will protect.

 

Parangtritis Beach  & Hotel Queen of the South

Many Javanese people believe that Parang Tritis Beach is the gate of Ratu Kidul’s magical kingdom.

On top of the cliff at the beach, there’s a beautiful 5 star hotel which is named after the Ratu Kidul and which even holds a bungalow, reserved especially for her! You can find the bungalow 033 in the back of the garden, from the porch in the front you directly look at the sea. In the living / dining room there’s a bed with green sheets, under the bed are green sandals. In the corner of the bed, a pot with sand to burn incense sticks. And in front of the bed a dressings table with mirrors and a lot of make up. So Ratu Kidul and one of her lovers could spend the night here.

Room_Ratu_KidulPhoto by an unknown visitor.

 

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Note; I never visited this bungalow myself and I’m not 100% sure if it’s still there due to a big earth quake around 2008 when the hotel was completely destroyed. Last time when I was there (October, 2014) the hotel was completely rebuild and looking beautiful again, but I’m not sure if the bungalow is still there. What I know is that the bungalow is not always open for public, you have to request it if you want to see it (just like the other rooms reserved for Ratu Kidul in Indonesia, like the one in Hotel Samudra at Pelabuhan Ratu) Probably the queen preferred to spend more time at Parang Kusomo at the beach of Parang Tritis. A walled space with 2 stone blocks as thrones. One for the Sultan & one for Ratu Kidul. In that holy place, offerings and prayers are made every day.

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Photo’s made by our friend, Joel Kiel, during our trip to Parang Tritis in October, 2014. 

 

Parang Tritis is just a place that I keep coming back to, where I really love to be and make long walks on the beach. Still a very calm, non-touristic mystical place. I can’t wait to return!

– Lielo

 

 

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Art

GOLD OF THE GODS – WORLDMUSEUM ROTTERDAM

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Last week I saw a news article online that they currently have an exhibition called the Gold of the Gods from Java at the World Art Museum at the harbor of Rotterdam. So that sounded like something we had to see!

– The mysterious world of the Javanese Kingdom remained closed to outsiders for over a thousand years, with only the statues hewn from lava rock at Borobudur displaying the wealth with which the Javanese rulers venerated their gods. The Wereldmuseum is bringing you a world première with its exhibition Gold of the Gods. It is a privilege to show you the most extensive collection of Javanese gold from the seventh to the eleventh centuries on display today, the beauty of which can barely be grasped by contemporary audiences.
On special occasions Javanese royalty would adorn themselves with jewelry originally intended for the gods, in honor of Vishnu, Shiva, and Parvati by embodying them. The jewelry itself was crafted by the most highly renowned goldsmiths, requiring not only superior craftsmanship but also spiritual knowledge as illustrated by the sagas and legends adorning the individual pieces and that portray the active role played by the gods in Javanese society.
The Wereldmuseum is proud to be the first museum in the world to exhibit this collection. Being aware of our tremendous responsibility not only towards the collector, but also with regard to the collection’s history, our aim was to create a presentation that will enable the audience to tangibly perceive the contemporary mysteries surrounding the works on display.
This production was made possible with the cooperation of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum in Leeuwarden, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and, in particular, the National Museum of World Cultures in Amsterdam and Leiden. These museums were willing to lend us several pieces from their permanent collections to enhance our exhibition. Additionally, the Documentation Centre for Ancient Indonesian Art in Amsterdam lent us several photographs of the Borobudur. We are very grateful for these valuable additions to the exhibition.-

 

Yesterday we had a day off and decided to make a trip to the museum in Rotterdam. It turned out to be a very impressive collection of golden jewelry from Java, holding some very exclusive items which we never saw anywhere else before. The set up of the museum is quite simple but classy. You can get really close to the items, exposed in glass showcases  to be able to see the extreme details and complex designs of this ancient jewelry.

Beside the exhibition of the Indonesian gold, there’s a big Tibetan / Japanese section in the museum. Showing a great collection of buddha statues in all different forms and size’s and a great example of a traditional Buddhistic temple. Even the Dalai Lama personally visited the museum in May last year! At the end of the exhibition you will find a gift shop, with a small book section selling a great selection of books about Indonesia,Tibet, batik, keris, wayang, the Pacific, buddhism, etc!

 

Ratu_KidulI was very happy to find this little book about Kanjeng Ratu Kidul by Ruud Greve, The Legend of the South Sea Queen. A Javanese mystery that fascinates me for years already. Soon more about this story on the blog!

Overall it was a nice, educative day out. We would definitely recommend this exhibition / museum to everybody who is interested in ancient jewelry or the Indonesian / Tibetan heritage in general.

You can still visit this exhibition till 6 April 2015.

Entrance: 15,- + free audio tour / CJP: 3,- / free guided tours on every Sunday

 

 

 

 

 

 

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For more information: http://www.wereldmuseum.nl/

 

 

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SELAMAT SIANG!

 

We are back!

 

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A couple of days ago we arrived back in The Netherlands from our trip to Indonesia. It was great, relaxing and inspiring. I wonder if it ever will become easier to say goodbye to this beautiful country? But we keep in mind that it’s never a definite goodbye, more a see-you-again-soon! This time Ade took some time to learn more about Balinese ornaments and carvings. We visited some stunning beaches and parks in and around Bandung, Lembang, Yogyakarta and Bali. And visited some traditional theater shows (Wayang, Ramayana, Kecak), which are always very inspiring to see with their beautiful complex costumes and dances. In Ubud, Bali, Ade learned more about the art of Balinese masks and the meanings behind them from by a local mask maker. So we returned back to Holland full of inspiration and idea’s for new designs and artworks. Now back to reality!


 

Other recent news:

TATTOO PLANET – ADE ITAMEDA

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This month you can find some of Ade’s recent work in the Dutch Tattoo magazine, Tattoo Planet.

So go and get him at your local bookstore!

 

FRANKFURT TATTOO CONVENTION 2015

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In the beginning of the next year, Ade Itameda will be joining the 23th International Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2015.

More then 600 tattoo artists from over 20 countries are expected to join this event. This event, which has developed in recent years to be the world’s greatest spectacle of his kind presenting renowned artists from all over the world, with this year a special feature: Traditional tattoo craft.

• Internationalen Frankfurter Tattoo Convention – Messe Frankfurt, Germany – March 20, 21, 22 2015    / more info: http://www.convention-frankfurt.de/joom/

still free spots open

 

More dates of tattoo conventions that Ade Itameda will attend in the new year will be announced soon.

 

– Lielo

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KRIS / KERIS ON LEG

Keris

The Kris or Keris is a Javanese asymmetrical dagger most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia or Javanese culture. In Indonesia, people believe that the Krises have magical powers.

The earliest Krises known were made around 1360 AD and most probably spread from the island of throughout Southeast Asia. Krises have been produced in many different places in Indonesia for centuries, but the Kris is mostly used, worshiped and seen in ceremonies in Central Java (besides the regular use in ceremonies of Krises in Bali).  As the result, in Indonesia Krises are commonly associated with the Javanese culture, although other ethnicities such as Balinese, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar and Malay people are also very familiar with the weapon as part of their culture. The Kris is most known for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well. A Kris can be divided into three parts: bilah (blade), hulu (hilt), and warangka (sheath). These parts of the Kris are often carved into extreme detail and made from various materials like metal, precious or rare types of wood, gold or ivory. They are art objects on their own. Some blades can be made in a relatively short time, while some weapons take years to complete.

The dhapur (the form and design of the blade, has around 150 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, has around 60 variants), and tangguh is referring to the age and origin of a Kris. Depending on the quality and historical value of the Kris, the value in money can go up to thousands of dollars or more. Both used a weapon and as a spiritual object, Krises are often considered to possess magical powers, with some blades seen as holders for good luck and others holding the bad. Krises are also often used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, as extra equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for a ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, and as a symbol of heroism, etc.

Krises are made by a Kris blacksmith called, empu. Before the empu starts making the Kris, he will first have a conversation with the client to make sure the Kris will be adapted to the exact wishes of the future owner. Empu are highly respected craftsmen with additional knowledge in literature, history, the occult, etc. By performing specific rituals before, during and after the process of forging the Kris, it will give the Kris his energetic load. Because a Kris is always made specifically for one person, it could be that a Kris of someone else is not ‘a good match’ for you. That doesn’t mean the Kris is ‘bad or wrong’, but it doesn’t fit the person. Krises need to be washed and ‘reloaded’ every once in a while, this comes with a very complex and sometimes even dangerous ritual of washing, drying and oil. Dangerous because some people try to use Arsenic, to make the pamor show up better. After washing the Kris, incense is being used to dry the blade and after that treated with oil. Krises are always highly cherished and taken care of to preserve their magical powers. 

Until the 1990s, Kris-making activities in Java had almost come to a standstill due to economic difficulties and changing socio-cultural values. Over the past three decades, Krises have lost their prominent social and spiritual meaning in society. Only a handful active and respected empus still produce high quality Krises in the traditional way but their number is dramatically decreasing and it’s getting more difficult to find them.

– Ade Itameda

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BACK IN HOLLAND + CIREBON MASK

Cirebon_Mask

We’re back in Holland! Still a bit jet-lagged but at least we took the sun with us!

Last week Ade started working again and his first customer requested to do a traditional Cirebon dancing-mask. Masks are used during important dancing rituals in Indonesia for over a thousand years. Sometimes the mask dance can be performed by solo dancers, or it can also be performed by several people. Masks are used to create more than the character in a drama. Graceful hand and body movements, and accompaniment by the music of a Gamelan, are hallmarks of Javanese mask dance. The dance is performed on special occasions for local officials, or for other traditional celebrations. The Topeng, is a performance which enacts stories from the times of the old Balinese and Javanese kingdoms and creates a link with the ancestor world. The three types of masks used in these dramas are; humans, animals, and demons.The powerful lines of a mask catch the light with a greater impact than that of a human face alone, and the stability of the mask’s features has an intensity stronger than that of a human expression. The masks are almost always carved from wood, mask makers combine different materials like boar’s teeth, horsehair, jewels, gold leaf, Chinese coins, buffalo hide, rabbit pelts, and mirrors. The glossy effect is created by endless sanding and at least 40 coats of paint.

Underneath here you can see a small video of a traditional Cirebon mask dance:

 

 

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THE MYSTERY OF THE CHICKEN CHURCH

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Last week Ade and me made a trip to Yogjakarta, with actually one mission. Find the Chicken Church!

First I was not sure about making this post because something in me didn’t want to reveal the truth about this mysterious building. But because there’s so less information about this church on the internet, I had to share the true story.

A couple of months ago Ade read a status update of a friend on Facebook talking about a mysterious building called the Chicken Church located somewhere on the top of a mountain close to the famous temple the Borobudur in Magelang. I was instantly fascinated and I directly knew ‘We need to go there’. After checking around on the internet and Google earth (I was convinced the church was ‘photo-shopped’ into the map), I realized there was no one who could exactly explain anything about the history or function of the building, neither his age or exact location. I only knew this was certainly not a tourist attraction. I found a blog of someone in Indonesia who visited the church and gave a small explanation about how to go there. We decided to rent a car and see how close we could come.

We followed the given description and found a small gang leading to a even smaller road into a village. After wandering around for a while we realized we needed some help and decided to ask some locals. Easier said then done, because most people who live in small villages like that are elderly people. They live so isolated that they rarely have any visitors. Besides that they are always very happy to help you, but you have to accept and answer fully in Javanese (Very different from Bahasa), mostly in the style of ‘Aaaahhh yes! Here a little bit to the left… And then a little bit up the hill… And then you have to ask someone again…‘ You can imagine that those are not the most clear descriptions, but with a little bit of fantasy you can guess where you have to go. At the end of the road before we would really drive into the middle of nowhere we found a small house. We decided to ask the people if they could tell us the road to the church. They told us we only had to walk up hill for around 10-20 minutes and we would find the church ourselves. Parked the car and started walking. After crossing a very scary bamboo bridge and struggling for half an hour through the jungle we almost wanted to give up, until suddenly in front of us the head of the chicken appeared. I can tell you, it was the most surreal thing I ever saw. A 30 meter long, building in the shape of a chicken. Sadly enough we saw that the building was in a poor shape. The paint was peeled of the walls and the nice stone ornamental windows on the side of the church we’re damaged. The main structure of the church was still ok.

But the panoramic view was unbelievable. The weird thing is that your seeing something so great and that you want to share it, but that you are the only two people there. From the back of the church you could look into the auditorium of the church, that was empty beside some big white pillars. Because there was some sort of hole on the left side of the church, we realized that there had to be a whole floor underneath it. We decided not to enter the building because it simply looked to unsafe. In the ceiling of the church there was a big cross shaped ‘window’. After a while we decided we had to head back to the car before it would turn dark.

When we arrived in the hotel, I could’t get the church out of my head. Because there was such little information available, I needed to know more. The people in the village, told us it was owned by some Chinese business man who wanted to turn it into a hotel or that it served as a Christian Church, no clear explanations.

I decided to try to find any information on the internet and after being lead from one website to another I found that the church was also known as ‘Banyak Angkrem‘, which leaded me to a blog of a guy who was asking himself the same question as me ‘What is this place?‘.

The church turned out to be a dove instead of a chicken. His blog leaded me to an email conversation between a girl and a man who turned out to be the owner and builder of this strange church named Daniel Alamsjah. Finally some answers on all my questions!

Daniel was married to one of the woman in the nearby village in the 90’s, the story goes that one day in 1988 Daniel got a vision of God. God told him that he had to build a church on a hill in the shape of a dove. A place to unite Christians from all around the world. Every day God spoke to him in this vision . Until one day he decided to visit his mother in law who was living in a small village on the foot of the hill Menoreh, called Gombong. Daniel had a strong feeling that he needed to climb this hill, when he arrived on the top of the hill he decided to pray. ‘Was this the hill he saw in his visions?‘ He realized that he would never have enough money to buy this ground and build the church of his vision. He prayed and he prayed for days on top of the hill until he knew that God would help him no matter what. Within 6 months he managed to own 2,5 hectare of the ground on top of the hill and in 1994 he finally started building on his dream project. Due to the economic crisis in Indonesia that time, he run out of money and the sponsors who worked with him on this project him lost interest. In the time that the project came to an end he completed 70% of the church. Until today Daniel still believes that one day he will realize his dream project with the help of God.

What seemed to be a house of some mysterious, occult, society turned out to be a very ambitious, religious project of a man who got a vision of God.

Later I found some information on the internet that in the early days this building, in that time called Bukit Merpati, also served as a rehab clinic for drugs users. In the end, after finding out the true story it didn’t actually change anything about my opinion how surreal and somehow creepy this place was. Certainly something worth visiting when you’re around!


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Underneath here you can find a video impression of the church.

 

 

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INDONESIAN ROOTS

First of all: Happy new year! We hope 2013 will be a great, healthy and creative year for all of you!

Recently we had some customers coming in who wanted to have a designs done which are resembling  their Indonesian roots. Some of them have Indonesian fathers, mothers, grandmothers, aunties or other family members. And even in some cases we have people contacting us who don’t have a connection with Indonesia because of their family but just because they have a particular interest in the culture, history or traditions. It’s always great to hear the stories and reasons about why someone wants to get a specific design tattooed. In this way we can keep ancient symbols and images alive and pass it on to the next generations.

 

Javanese Mask.

Javanese Mask.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

 

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

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