Tag Archives: Hindu

WAYANG KULIT – BIMA

Bima

After the Tattoo Convention Rotterdam 2016 (thanks everyone for dropping by!), last week Ade worked on an upper arm design inspired by a figure found in Wayang Kulit.

BIMA

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Bima is the second of the Pandawa (Pandava) brothers and a leading character in the epic Mahabharata. He is a strong and bold character as reflected in his round eyes and wide
stance. He was surrounded by a whirlwind wherever he went and he is also instantly recognisable by his long fingernails that act as his weapon (Pancanaka).

He is seen as a heroic figure and known as a powerful figure, he is always rude and intimidating for the enemy, even though his heart soft. Bima characteristics are brave, steadfast, strong, stoic, obedient and honest, and he considers all people equal. He never curses or sits in front of a person he talks to. He has three wives and three children. Having descended from the wind god Vayu, Bima has the ability to fly, as does his half-brother Hanuman (Hanoman) and his son Ghatotkacha.

The vast majority of the ‘Wayang’ plays performed are drawn from the two great Hindu epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata with as well as stories of Javanese origin. ‘Wayang kulit’ is considered as the highest of the Javanese performing arts. Performed in the royal courts of Java as early as the ninth century, this tradition continues to be treasured as one of the ‘pusaka’ or sacred heirlooms of the court. ‘Wayang kulit’ is traditionally performed on ritual days and religious ceremonies. It has also been adapted more recently for television and public education campaigns.

Here a nice example of some Wayang kulit play showing the character Bima.

Video by Antonius Oktaviano Wiriadjaja

 

Next thing is: Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2016! See you there!

– Lielo

 

 

 

 

 

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

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The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Tattoo_Energy

Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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TEMPLE GUARDIAN INSPIRED CHEST

 

 

Ade_Itameda_Necklace_Guardian_Bali

Guardians_Temple_Bali

click on photo’s for a bigger view

We’re already two weeks into the new year, time flies! We started fresh, full of new inspiration & energy!

Ade started working on this great chest piece a week ago. The design is inspired on the chest / neck ornaments of the guardians in front of the temples in Bali. First these statues were placed only in Pura (temples) and Puri (Royal homes), but nowadays they can be found in front of most of the houses in Bali. The statues are usually placed as protectors, on the left and right sides of the gate and have an important symbolism for Balinese people. Sometimes they look alike, but they are not identical. Often the statues are like a mirror image rather than an exact replica. For example if one statue makes a looks to the left, the other would make it to the right. Other statues that you can find surrounding temples and houses in Bali are mostly related to Hindu gods (and statues related to Ramayana and Mahabharata).

 

– Lielo

 

 

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GANESHA

 

Ganesha_Aida

 

A while ago Ade finished a back-piece on Michelle. To explain the meaning of the Ganesha in one sentence is technically seen impossible. The story behind ‘Lord Ganesh’, the famous Hindu Elephant God, is so complex that there’s not only one way of explaining it.

I will try to tell you a little bit more about this famous religious figure, found mostly in India. Ganesha, also called Ganesh or Ganapanti Tantra is seen as the biggest deity of Hinduism, a deity with a head of a elephant. He is the God of wisdom and knowledge, takes away obstacles in life and he is the protector of travellers. Hindu’s pray to Ganesha before they start something new, like a new job or moving out to a new house. Ganesha is the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is mostly portrayed with and mouse or a rat, named Mushika, as his ‘Vahana’ (vehicle).

When Ganesh was still very young, he wanted to be left alone and preferred to spend his time wandering around by himself. Because of that reason and because of the fact that Shiva had started a war, Shiva never had the opportunity to really get to know his son. After years and years of battle’s Shiva returned to Parvati and Ganesh. When he arrived at the house he saw an intruder. And because he was so incredibly sanguineous he instantly decapitated the intruder. But he didn’t see that the intruder was  actually his own son! He didn’t recognize Ganesh on the first sight because Shiva never really been close to him. Because Shiva felt devastated  he commended his servants to bring him the head of the first creature they would see alive. After a short period of time they returned with the cut-off head of an elephant. Shiva put the head of the elephant on the lifeless body of his son and Ganesha directly rose from the death and entered history as a half-god with the head of an elephant.

There are many different appearances of Ganesh, every time shown with different attributes. In the case of this tattoo, a key (client’s wish), a lotus and a plate with candy. Mostly Ganesha is portrayed with a big, bare belly and a rose-orange skin, a rat sitting next to his feet and off course an elephant head. Sometimes Ganesha has an symbol between his eye’s and trunk which looks like the number ‘3’, similar to the symbol of Om or Aum; the sound of the vibration out of which the universe was created.

Ganesha is also seen as the one who wrote down the Mahabharata (One of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India). And anywhere in India you will find statues of him which they believe will help travellers to make the decision which way they need to go. Ganesha is always symbolizing the start of something, the first impulse.

 

 

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SINTA

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She is the wife of Rama, the seventh avatāra of Vishnu in the Hindu tradition. Sinta is one of the principal characters in the Ramayana, a Hindu epic named after her husband Rama. Sinta was born in Sitamarhi (Punaura) in Bihar and soon after her birth, taken to Janakpur in present day Nepal by her father, Janaka. She is esteemed as the standard setter for wifely and womanly virtues for all Hindu women. Understood theologically in Hinduism, Sinta is an avatāra of Lakshmi.

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SAM + JOEL

Sam wanted to make a tattoo influenced by the place where he has his roots. His family comes from Manado, Sulawesi. Where the owl is an important symbol. Ade turned it into a more modern version.

Joël, wanted to get tattooed for more then 12 years, but could not find the suitable design. We met him a couple of weeks ago and it directly clicked. And day by day Ade started to design an unique design for him, based on him as a person.

Because Joël is a light-painter, you can see his work here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joelkiel1982/, and a creative mind, he told us:

My creativity starts in my mind, after that it flows through my heart, through my arms, into my hands‘.

A little explanation about the piece:

The upper part is the Sri Yantra, which excists out of 9 triangles which are all created out of the center point, the Bindu. It’s an symbol of man and woman, and also for: Shiva (the male) and Shakti (Female). For Joël it symbolizes the connection between new ideas and ideals. For creation and creativity.

The text is Om Mani Padme Hum, a mantra. For Joël it means being proud, passional and a new start. The mantra is mirrored on the other side to show the two sides of life, black and white, life and death etc. You can also see the Wheel of Dharma which is a symbol that has represented Dharma, the Buddah’s teaching of the path to enlightenment.

For a first tattoo, this design was kinda heavy. But Joël seperated the man from the boys and handled the pain very well ;) This piece will be continued later to be a full sleeve.

All photo’s made by Lielo photography.

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