Tag Archives: Female

NEW T-SHIRTS, TOTE-BAGS & PRINTS 2016

New t-shirts done, inspired by Balinese / Javanese Perada design. Normally Perada is used as decoration in ceremonies in Bali, you can also see it wrapped around temples and is also used in dancer’s costumes. Well this t-shirt is not as cool as the original perada, but ya, sharing culture is always fun.! First will be available at the Mondial du Tattouage convention Paris. and also some available in the shop @25tolifetattoos.

T-shirts available in size S / M / L / XL (only a limited amount of T-shirts available).Preview_t-shirts

Click on photo for bigger preview

 

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Click on photo for bigger preview

 

And also 3 different limited (a4 / squared) prints & some awesome tote-bags made by Ade will be available at the Mondial du Tattouage convention Paris.

The convention will start on upcoming Thursday, so see you all there!

– Lielo

 

 

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GODDESS GUAN YIN

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Last week Ade continued to work on this sleeve, this time he added the Goddess on the lower arm called Guan Yin. 

Guan Yin means “Observing the Sounds (or Cries) of the (human) World”. In Chinese Buddhism, Guan Yin is the same as the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (enlightenment being), the highest form of mercy, compassion, kindness & love. Along with Buddhism, Guan Yin was introduced into China as early as the 1st century AD, and slowly reached Japan on the way from Korea and to the other areas of Southeast Asia. Soon after Buddhism was introduced into the country for the first time around the mid-7th century. 

Guan Yin is very often portrayed as a beautiful woman in long, flowing white robes. In her right hand, she holds a jar containing pure, clear water, while her left hand bears the branch of a willow tree. Sometimes, she is accompanied by either two children or two warriors, while other images show her with a bird or astride a dragon. Some ancient depictions of Guan Yin show her dressed as a young girl holding a fish basket, which has probably contributed to her association with fishermen and the sea in certain coastal areas of China. She protects the distressed and hungry, rescues the unfortunate from danger, and gives comfort and aid wherever it is needed. And different then many other, she puts charity to shame, because she will never ask for donations. She had finally attained enlightenment after struggling with non-things. She was just about to enter heaven to join the other buddha’s when she heard the cries of the poor unsaved souls back on Earth. She felt touched and wanted to help and said that she will never rest until every single soul was brought to the world of Buddha’s. As a ‘holy being’ often called to appear in the most unusual and strange situations, she has the ability to transform into any living thing. In fact she’s better known in India as a male. But she often appears in female form to stay incognito. Guan Yin is without a doubt one of the most beloved deities in both religious and folk beliefs in China. Many believe that Guan Yin is the mother of all mankind, an idea that reminds us of the Virgin Mary.

 

 

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GANESHA

 

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A while ago Ade finished a back-piece on Michelle. To explain the meaning of the Ganesha in one sentence is technically seen impossible. The story behind ‘Lord Ganesh’, the famous Hindu Elephant God, is so complex that there’s not only one way of explaining it.

I will try to tell you a little bit more about this famous religious figure, found mostly in India. Ganesha, also called Ganesh or Ganapanti Tantra is seen as the biggest deity of Hinduism, a deity with a head of a elephant. He is the God of wisdom and knowledge, takes away obstacles in life and he is the protector of travellers. Hindu’s pray to Ganesha before they start something new, like a new job or moving out to a new house. Ganesha is the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is mostly portrayed with and mouse or a rat, named Mushika, as his ‘Vahana’ (vehicle).

When Ganesh was still very young, he wanted to be left alone and preferred to spend his time wandering around by himself. Because of that reason and because of the fact that Shiva had started a war, Shiva never had the opportunity to really get to know his son. After years and years of battle’s Shiva returned to Parvati and Ganesh. When he arrived at the house he saw an intruder. And because he was so incredibly sanguineous he instantly decapitated the intruder. But he didn’t see that the intruder was  actually his own son! He didn’t recognize Ganesh on the first sight because Shiva never really been close to him. Because Shiva felt devastated  he commended his servants to bring him the head of the first creature they would see alive. After a short period of time they returned with the cut-off head of an elephant. Shiva put the head of the elephant on the lifeless body of his son and Ganesha directly rose from the death and entered history as a half-god with the head of an elephant.

There are many different appearances of Ganesh, every time shown with different attributes. In the case of this tattoo, a key (client’s wish), a lotus and a plate with candy. Mostly Ganesha is portrayed with a big, bare belly and a rose-orange skin, a rat sitting next to his feet and off course an elephant head. Sometimes Ganesha has an symbol between his eye’s and trunk which looks like the number ‘3’, similar to the symbol of Om or Aum; the sound of the vibration out of which the universe was created.

Ganesha is also seen as the one who wrote down the Mahabharata (One of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India). And anywhere in India you will find statues of him which they believe will help travellers to make the decision which way they need to go. Ganesha is always symbolizing the start of something, the first impulse.

 

 

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INDONESIAN ROOTS

First of all: Happy new year! We hope 2013 will be a great, healthy and creative year for all of you!

Recently we had some customers coming in who wanted to have a designs done which are resembling  their Indonesian roots. Some of them have Indonesian fathers, mothers, grandmothers, aunties or other family members. And even in some cases we have people contacting us who don’t have a connection with Indonesia because of their family but just because they have a particular interest in the culture, history or traditions. It’s always great to hear the stories and reasons about why someone wants to get a specific design tattooed. In this way we can keep ancient symbols and images alive and pass it on to the next generations.

 

Javanese Mask.

Javanese Mask.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

Hanacaraka/Aksara Jawa. Traditional Javanese writing.

 

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on the female Javanese wayang shadow puppet called Shinta.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

Based on Garuda mask from Bali, Indonesia.

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WAYANG PIECES

In progress.

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SINTA

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She is the wife of Rama, the seventh avatāra of Vishnu in the Hindu tradition. Sinta is one of the principal characters in the Ramayana, a Hindu epic named after her husband Rama. Sinta was born in Sitamarhi (Punaura) in Bihar and soon after her birth, taken to Janakpur in present day Nepal by her father, Janaka. She is esteemed as the standard setter for wifely and womanly virtues for all Hindu women. Understood theologically in Hinduism, Sinta is an avatāra of Lakshmi.

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ANIA JALOSINSKA

Yesterday Lielo got tattooed by the sweet Ania Jalosinska!

Ania Jalosinska is a graphic and fashion designer, who has been studying under Lane Turowksi and is now producing one-of-a-kind highly dynamic tattoos.

Her design background comes through strongly in her tattoo art balancing visual impact, form and pieces that are anything but static.

If you want to see more of her work:

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=720750683

http://www.thirtysixtytwo.com/ania.html

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TATTOOS ADE

Aksara jawa lettering and flower inspired by batik ornaments

Aksara jawa:

The earliest known writing in Javanese dates from the 4th Century AD, at which time Javanese was written with the Pallava alphabet. By the 10th Century, the Kawi alphabet, which developed from Pallava, had a distinct Javanese form.

By the 17th Century, the Javanese alphabet, also known as tjarakan or carakan, had developed into its current form. During the Japanese occupation of Indonesia between 1942 and 1945, the alphabet was prohibited.

For a period from the 15th Century onwards, Javanese was also written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, called pégon or gundil.

Since the Dutch introduced the Latin alphabet to Indonesia in the 19th Century, the Javanese alphabet has gradually been supplanted. Today it is used almost exclusively by scholars and for decoration. Those who can read and write it are held in high esteem.

  • Javanese is a syllabic alphabet – each letter has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels can be indicated using a variety of diacritics which appear above, below, in front of or after the main letter.
  • Each consonants has two forms: the aksara form is used at the beginning of a syllable, while the pasangan form, which usually appears below the aksara form, is used for the second consonant of a consonant cluster and mutes the vowel of the aksara.
  • There are a number of special letters called aksara murda or aksara gedhe (great or important letters) which are used for honorific purposes, such as to write the names of respected people.
  • The order of the consonants makes the following saying, “Hana caraka, data sawala padha jayanya, maga bathanga” which means “There were (two) emissaries, they began to fight, their valor was equal, they both fell dead”

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TATTOOS ADE

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SKETCHING

Because the last t-shirts we made where a big succes, we decided to design some new ones.

We’re still busy sketching for the new t-shirts, but here’s a little sneak preview of the t-shirt design for the man! The design for the woman t-shirts will follow soon. We can’t tell you allot of details about the new designs, because we want to keep it as a suprise.These t-shirts will be limited again to a total amount of 24 t-shirts per design, and will not be reprinted again.

Soon we will show the new designs, you just need to be a little bit more patient!

We can also announce that Lielo will be selling framed prints of her photo’s. More details will follow soon!

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