Tag Archives: Diamond

MARTIN’S SIDE PIECE

When used in Buddhist literature, the Sanskrit word vajra usually is defined “diamond” or “adamantine.” It can also mean “thunderbolt,” although this definition of vajra is more often associated with Hinduism.

A diamond is spotlessly pure and indestructible. As such, the word vajra sometimes signifies enlightenment, or the absolute reality of shunyata, “emptiness.”

The vajra also is ritual object associated with Tibetan Buddhism, also called by its Tibetan name, dorje. These objects usually are made of bronze, vary in size and have three, five or nine spokes that usually close at each end in lotus shape. The number of spokes and the way they come together, or not, at the ends have numerous symbolic meanings.

In Tibetan ritual, the vajra often is used together with a bell. The vajra is held in the left hand and represents the male principle, upaya, action or means. The bell is held in the right hand and represents the female principle, prajna, wisdom.

A double dorje, or vishvavajra, are two dorjes connected to form a cross. A double dorje represents the foundation of the physical world and is also associated with certain tantric deities.

 

Martin is one of Ade’s most supportive customers. Besides the Barong chest piece and the full Wayang sleeve, he know got an amazing side piece done by Ade. This will be continued later with the Tibetan Bell in the same idea on his other side.

Thanks Martin for all your support so far!

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VAJRA CHEST

Vajra. In Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond. Vajra was also the son of Aniruddha and great grandson of Shri Krishna. As a material device, the vajra is a ritual object, a short metal weapon—originally a kind of fist-iron like Japanese yawara—that has the symbolic nature of a diamond (it can cut any substance but not be cut itself) and that of the thunderbolt (irresistible force).

The vajra is believed to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power. It is a ritual tool or spiritual implement which is symbolically used by Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, all of which are traditions of Dharma. Because of its symbolic importance, the vajra spread along with Indian religion and culture to other parts of Asia. It was used as both a weapon and a symbol in Nepal, India, Tibet, Bhutan, Siam, Cambodia, Myanmar, China, Korea and Japan.

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TATTOO CONVENTION ANTWERPEN

We didn’t plan to go in the first place, but we decided to join the Tattoo Convention in Antwerpen this week. Our friend, Andy, from Tattoo Left Hand in Driebergen got an beautiful tattoo by Ade and he decided to join a contest on the convention and Ade won the 1st price in the category Tribal or Celtic! Thank you Andy, Nicole, Guy and all the other people for this amazing weekend!

14 April we will be heading back to Indonesia, and we probably will be back around July!

 

 

All photo’s made by Lielo photography.

 

 

 

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BODY ART FESTIVAL BANDUNG

We had a blast at Body Art Festival in Bandung! 2 days of fun, meeting people, promoting our work, making tattoo’s and watching other people getting tattooed! And we kicked ass as our team! Durga won the first price in the category Tribal and Ade won the third place in that category!  Here is a photo impression of the convention, also including some photo’s of the tattoo’s Ade made this last weeks.

 

All photo’s are made by Lielo.

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