Tag Archives: Culture

Art

BALI – SETIA DARMA / HOUSE OF MASK & PUPPETS

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The second highlight of our trip through Indonesia we like to tell you more about is the Setia Darma, House of Mask & Puppets museum in Ubud, Bali.

2 years ago we already had the plan to visit this museum, but at that time we couldn’t find the place and due to some unlucky circumstances on the way we had to return to our hotel. So this year we wanted to give it another try!

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Setia Darma, The House of Masks and Puppets was initiated by Mr. Hadi Sunyoto, a businessman and cultural enthusiast, who has been collecting masks and puppets from different regions in Indonesia for the past seven years. Concerned with the lack of appreciation and awareness towards the disappearing traditional art form of masks and puppets in Indonesia, he decided to create a space to collect, preserve and spread the knowledge of the art form of masks and puppets. As a result, the House of Masks and Puppets was built in 2006.

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They’re mission is to inspire people to learn about the culture of the past for the benefits of the present and future life. And to conserve the art form of masks and puppets from different regions of Indonesia, as well as from other countries. The collection of the House of Masks and Puppets currently consists of approximately 6900 items, of which 1300 are masks from Indonesia, Africa, and Japan; whilst the other 5700 are puppets from Indonesia, China, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar, and Cambodia. Although the House of Masks and Puppets has several objects from other countries, the collection mostly consists of items from various regions in Indonesia.

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The collections of the House of Masks and Puppets are housed in four different traditional Javanese antique houses or commonly known as Joglo. These unique Joglos are mostly originated from East and Middle Java.

 

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We can say, this is one of the most amazing museums we have ever visited. A breathtaking collection of masks, perfectly conserved and displayed. We were actually a bit surprised that we didn’t need to pay an entrance fee to enter this museum. (We we’re completely willing to put down 200.000 IDR. if needed to see this collection up close). There even was a worker of the museum who gave us a little tour through the museum and told us more about the different sort of masks and their origins. This is definitely the place to be if you’re interested in masks & puppets from Indonesia and Asia in general!

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Setia Darma, House of Masks & Puppets

Kubu Bingin Cultural Village
Jl. Tegal Bingin
Banjar Tengkulak Tengah
Kemenuh Village, Sukawati,
Gianyar, Bali

entrance fee: free (you can leave a donation to support the museum)

http://www.setiadarma.org/

– Lielo

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2015 -> 2016

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The year is slowly coming to an end…and we can say, 2015 was again a great, productive, exciting year!

A small overview; This year, Ade joined 3 conventions (Rotterdam, Frankfurt, Paris), he got published in some amazing books (for the last publication of his work, check below), we traveled to Antwerp, Berlin &  Milan and off course Ade was very happy to work on all the great and sometimes challenging designs he made for you guys this year! Big thanks to you all!

Soon we will take a well deserved break from work / vacation to relax and to spend some time with our family’s, to recharge and hunt for new idea’s. But in the new year we will return, rested and full of new inspiration!

If you’re interested in an appointment with Ade in the new year, you can still send your requests to thisis369@gmail.com and please include all relevant information, see list here.

Because where ‘off’ the job during our vacation, it can take a while before you receive a reply back from us, but Ade will start replying his emails & booking new people in when he’s back in The Netherlands and is making his schedule for later next year. Thanks in advance for your patience!

AGENDA 2016

Tattoo Convention Paris 2016 – Le Mondial Du Tatouage
4 / 5 / 6 March 2016
http://www.mondialdutatouage.com/en/ (confirmed!)

• Tattoo Convention Rotterdam 2016 – 19 / 20 March 2016
http://rotterdam.unitedconventions.com/

 


 

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NEW T-SHIRTS

It’s been a while since we made some new 369 T-shirts so yesterday Ade started sketching some things up for a new design (more info will follow soon!) when suddenly a huge storm came up in Holland… And you all know, better safe then sorry! ;)


 

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THE WORLD ATLAS OF TATTOO

Sneak preview of this newly published ‘The World Atlas of Tattoo‘ by Anna Felicity Friedman, Yale University Press. In which you can find some of Ade’s work.

More info: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=9780300210484

http://blog.tattoodo.com/2015/08/world-atlas-tattoo-exploring-world-ink/

Thanks again for this opportunity! — with Tomasz Madej and Lars Krutak.


 

Again, thank you all for your support, promoting our works and your trust. We hope to see your around again next year! For now we want to wish you all a good ending of this year, hope it been just as awesome for you as it was for us and off course a great start of the new one. See you again in the new year!

Sampai Jumpa!

– 369

 

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

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Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

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The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

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Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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GUNUNGAN SHADOW PUPPET BACK PIECE

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Last week Ade stared lining up a big back-piece he will be working on. This time a very special ‘character’ from the wayang kulit shaddow puppet theatre, called Gunungan.

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GUNUNGAN / KAYON

Gunungan (mountains) or Kayon (tree) / the Cosmic Tree or Mountain of Life is a shadow puppet shaped like a mountain and represents the world and its content. On it you will find carved and painted, mythical symbols and animals. There are two types of Gunungan; on one version you will find the tree standing with his roots in a pond of water, which sometimes contains fish (female qualities) and the other one is one with a big gate guarded by two demon giants. They are the guards of heaven and represent the forces of greed and lust. The gate itself is the gate to heaven or perhaps a gate from the world of reality into the mystical world of the ancestors and the gods. The last one is usually slightly more pointed to represent the male qualities. In the tree you find many animals or fantastic creatures are depicted: a tiger, a bison, peacocks, birds, dragons etc. Resembling concepts such as pride, arrogance, and vanity. Half way up the tree is the big face of an demon, Kala / Raksasa , symbolizing the dangers of human life.

Before the wayang shadow puppet play starts, Gunungan is plugged in the middle of the screen, leaning slightly to the right. This means that the puppet play has not yet begun, like the world that has not yet been ‘opened’. Once the play starts, Gunungan will be moved and lined up on the right. It’s function during the performance is to mark the beginning of each scene.

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Besides that Gunungan is also used as a sign if there are any chances in the play, the stage or the story. Gunungan is also used to symbolize fire or wind. In this case Gunungan is reversed (flipped around) and on that side it reveals a huge demonic face with its tongue hanging out and eyes bulging. It’s consuming flames and fire. They evil energy is unleashed, it consumes and destroys. It’s energy turned negative.

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The Gunungan (the cosmic mountain or Tree of Life) has both practical and highly symbolic functions in the wayang performances. For example Gunungan can also be used to symbolize the jungle, a mountain or the ocean during some scenes of the play. In this case Gunungan can act as soil, jungles, streets and so on, following the dialogue of the puppeteer.

 

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After the play is finished, Gunungan is plugged in again in the middle of the screen, leaning slightly to the left, symbolizing that the story / play has finished.

The Gunungan shadow puppet is not only used in wayang kulit performances but also in wayang golek or klitik shows.

 

Click on the photo’s for a bigger preview!

 

– Lielo

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SELAMAT SIANG!

 

We are back!

 

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A couple of days ago we arrived back in The Netherlands from our trip to Indonesia. It was great, relaxing and inspiring. I wonder if it ever will become easier to say goodbye to this beautiful country? But we keep in mind that it’s never a definite goodbye, more a see-you-again-soon! This time Ade took some time to learn more about Balinese ornaments and carvings. We visited some stunning beaches and parks in and around Bandung, Lembang, Yogyakarta and Bali. And visited some traditional theater shows (Wayang, Ramayana, Kecak), which are always very inspiring to see with their beautiful complex costumes and dances. In Ubud, Bali, Ade learned more about the art of Balinese masks and the meanings behind them from by a local mask maker. So we returned back to Holland full of inspiration and idea’s for new designs and artworks. Now back to reality!


 

Other recent news:

TATTOO PLANET – ADE ITAMEDA

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This month you can find some of Ade’s recent work in the Dutch Tattoo magazine, Tattoo Planet.

So go and get him at your local bookstore!

 

FRANKFURT TATTOO CONVENTION 2015

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In the beginning of the next year, Ade Itameda will be joining the 23th International Frankfurt Tattoo Convention 2015.

More then 600 tattoo artists from over 20 countries are expected to join this event. This event, which has developed in recent years to be the world’s greatest spectacle of his kind presenting renowned artists from all over the world, with this year a special feature: Traditional tattoo craft.

• Internationalen Frankfurter Tattoo Convention – Messe Frankfurt, Germany – March 20, 21, 22 2015    / more info: http://www.convention-frankfurt.de/joom/

still free spots open

 

More dates of tattoo conventions that Ade Itameda will attend in the new year will be announced soon.

 

– Lielo

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TATTOO SPIRIT X UPCOMING TATTOO CONVENTIONS

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Busy weeks! Almost no time to update the blog, our excuses! Recently Ade Itameda had a radio interview with Hard Rock FM Jakarta (87.6) due to the National Batik Day 2014 in Indonesia and did an interview with the German tattoo magazine, Tattoo Spirit (interview by Lars Krutak) , which you can find in the stores now! So go and get it at your local bookstore or order it online here or check their FB page on https://www.facebook.com/tattoospirit

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Soon we will also upload the agenda of the upcoming Tattoo Conventions in Europe which we will join in 2015! This time we will be traveling around a bit more and when we have the exact travel schedule we will tell you how to make an appointment with Ade Itameda if you’re interested in getting tattooed on one of those dates / places.

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For now; we take a small break / vacation but we will be back in November! Sampai jumpa!

– Lielo

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4TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY!

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First we want to thank you all for your birthday wishes yesterday on Facebook, Twitter and by email! And we want to thank all of you for your support over the last 4 years! You guys are great. Man, time flies by…4 years. We started this blog and the concept of 369 four years ago, not knowing yet how this would develop. We wanted to create a name, a project and a platform for both of our expressions of art, tattooing and photography. Something that would represent a collaboration between two people, with both a passion to express them selves. One creating permanent designs, inspired by ancient ornaments and symbols with a modern touch and one in the world of still images telling hidden stories. We started this blog as our way to tell others about our art and interests. We started small but are now happy to welcome hundreds of new visitors each day, we feel blessed. In this year Ade travelled around, did some tattoo conventions and recently started a new adventure. Together with her colleague Joel (2XWORKS), Lielo (HOLY BIRD) decided to take a break for now from doing photo-shoots. She is still making photo’s on a daily basis but is now mainly focussing on the management part of 369 and Ade ItamedaAnd also in this new year we will keep uploading more of Ade’s tattoo work with background information and more travel-logs and photo’s of our trips! And there are some super exciting things in the pipeline, we can’t tell you more at this moment but more details will be posted soon! So keep an eye on the blog!

For now: Salam Budaya!

 

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KRIS / KERIS ON LEG

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The Kris or Keris is a Javanese asymmetrical dagger most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia or Javanese culture. In Indonesia, people believe that the Krises have magical powers.

The earliest Krises known were made around 1360 AD and most probably spread from the island of throughout Southeast Asia. Krises have been produced in many different places in Indonesia for centuries, but the Kris is mostly used, worshiped and seen in ceremonies in Central Java (besides the regular use in ceremonies of Krises in Bali).  As the result, in Indonesia Krises are commonly associated with the Javanese culture, although other ethnicities such as Balinese, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar and Malay people are also very familiar with the weapon as part of their culture. The Kris is most known for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well. A Kris can be divided into three parts: bilah (blade), hulu (hilt), and warangka (sheath). These parts of the Kris are often carved into extreme detail and made from various materials like metal, precious or rare types of wood, gold or ivory. They are art objects on their own. Some blades can be made in a relatively short time, while some weapons take years to complete.

The dhapur (the form and design of the blade, has around 150 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, has around 60 variants), and tangguh is referring to the age and origin of a Kris. Depending on the quality and historical value of the Kris, the value in money can go up to thousands of dollars or more. Both used a weapon and as a spiritual object, Krises are often considered to possess magical powers, with some blades seen as holders for good luck and others holding the bad. Krises are also often used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, as extra equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for a ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, and as a symbol of heroism, etc.

Krises are made by a Kris blacksmith called, empu. Before the empu starts making the Kris, he will first have a conversation with the client to make sure the Kris will be adapted to the exact wishes of the future owner. Empu are highly respected craftsmen with additional knowledge in literature, history, the occult, etc. By performing specific rituals before, during and after the process of forging the Kris, it will give the Kris his energetic load. Because a Kris is always made specifically for one person, it could be that a Kris of someone else is not ‘a good match’ for you. That doesn’t mean the Kris is ‘bad or wrong’, but it doesn’t fit the person. Krises need to be washed and ‘reloaded’ every once in a while, this comes with a very complex and sometimes even dangerous ritual of washing, drying and oil. Dangerous because some people try to use Arsenic, to make the pamor show up better. After washing the Kris, incense is being used to dry the blade and after that treated with oil. Krises are always highly cherished and taken care of to preserve their magical powers. 

Until the 1990s, Kris-making activities in Java had almost come to a standstill due to economic difficulties and changing socio-cultural values. Over the past three decades, Krises have lost their prominent social and spiritual meaning in society. Only a handful active and respected empus still produce high quality Krises in the traditional way but their number is dramatically decreasing and it’s getting more difficult to find them.

– Ade Itameda

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MH17 – NO WORDS

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 Our hearts goes out to all the victims and their surviving families & friends of the flight MH17.

There ‘s so many things we could say, but we simply don’t have the words.

Be thankful for every day.

– Ade Itameda & Lielo

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GODDESS GUAN YIN

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Last week Ade continued to work on this sleeve, this time he added the Goddess on the lower arm called Guan Yin. 

Guan Yin means “Observing the Sounds (or Cries) of the (human) World”. In Chinese Buddhism, Guan Yin is the same as the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (enlightenment being), the highest form of mercy, compassion, kindness & love. Along with Buddhism, Guan Yin was introduced into China as early as the 1st century AD, and slowly reached Japan on the way from Korea and to the other areas of Southeast Asia. Soon after Buddhism was introduced into the country for the first time around the mid-7th century. 

Guan Yin is very often portrayed as a beautiful woman in long, flowing white robes. In her right hand, she holds a jar containing pure, clear water, while her left hand bears the branch of a willow tree. Sometimes, she is accompanied by either two children or two warriors, while other images show her with a bird or astride a dragon. Some ancient depictions of Guan Yin show her dressed as a young girl holding a fish basket, which has probably contributed to her association with fishermen and the sea in certain coastal areas of China. She protects the distressed and hungry, rescues the unfortunate from danger, and gives comfort and aid wherever it is needed. And different then many other, she puts charity to shame, because she will never ask for donations. She had finally attained enlightenment after struggling with non-things. She was just about to enter heaven to join the other buddha’s when she heard the cries of the poor unsaved souls back on Earth. She felt touched and wanted to help and said that she will never rest until every single soul was brought to the world of Buddha’s. As a ‘holy being’ often called to appear in the most unusual and strange situations, she has the ability to transform into any living thing. In fact she’s better known in India as a male. But she often appears in female form to stay incognito. Guan Yin is without a doubt one of the most beloved deities in both religious and folk beliefs in China. Many believe that Guan Yin is the mother of all mankind, an idea that reminds us of the Virgin Mary.

 

 

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