Tag Archives: Buddhism

BUDDHISM PARASOL / UMBRELLA

Parasol

Ade recently did this Tibetan design on one of his returning customers.

Buddhism parasol / umbrella

In Buddhism, the parasol is a symbol of royal dignity and protection from the heat of the sun. Besides that it also represents protection from the “heat” of negative forces, like greed, lust and suffering, obstacles in the path towards enlightenment.

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The ornate parasol usually is depicted with a dome, representing wisdom and a “skirt” around the dome, representing compassion. Sometimes the dome is octagonal (having eight angles and eight sides), representing the Eightfold Path. Sometimes it is square, representing the four directional quarters.

The Buddhist parasol is part of 8 other important symbols of Buddhism, called the The Eight Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism.

 

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Click on image for a bigger preview

– Lielo

 

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

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The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

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Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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MAHAKALA X SLICKNICK

 

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Mahakala – protector against negativity

Done last week on our friend, Joel. 

Mahakala is a protector (Dharmapala) and the primary ‘Wisdom Protector’ of Himalayan and Tibetan Buddhism. There are dozens of different variations and forms of Mahakala. But he’s mostly shown in his wrathful appearance.

Mahakala may look frightening, but that’s not meant to make you afraid! Mahakala is the threatening and powerful embodiment of the bodhisattva of compassion. Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have to decided to say ‘no’ to entering paradise in order to help others attain enlightenment. He is always depicted as an extremely fierce and terrifying deity. His purpose is to help to overcome negative obstacles on the path to enlightenment and to protect them on their way to it. The mask of Mahakala is also meant to scare bad spirits and energy away from the place it protects. He is known as a compassionate protector, with all his aggression directed at those who would do harm. His anger is necessary because it gives him the fearsome power to demolish any enemies or obstacles on the way to enlightenment. His face is frightening also to scare away negative thoughts, actions, and energy. Mahakala masks are frequently found in temples and monasteries in Tibet, as well as in private homes as symbols of protection.

The cloud of fire above Mahakala‘s eyes and coming from his mouth represents his powerful energy. His third eye shows his function as a protector; three orbs of vision express his ability to see the past, present and future. Mahakala has a crown of five skulls, which represent the transmutation of five negative afflictions of human nature into virtues. As he confronts negative forces and crushes them with his anger, his crown of skulls neutralizes what remains and works to transform it into something positive. Which means that ignorance becomes wisdom, pride is humbled, attachment becomes the wisdom of discernment, jealously shifts to feeling satisfied with one’s own accomplishments, and anger is released and soothed.

Mahakala

Mahakala is always a protective deity with these features, but he can be portrayed in several different colors:

– Most of the time he is dark blue, which symbolizes the steady and enduring nature of dharma.
– Sometimes he is black; as black absorbs all other colors, so does Mahakala represent ultimate or absolute reality and transcendence of all form.
– Red Mahakala reflects in color his passionate and fiery nature.
– Mahakala in his white form helps one attain riches and a long life.

When you consider Mahakala as your spiritual bodyguard. He appears to be tough and extremely scary, but he is somebody you want to have on your side as you face the trials and obstacles in life!


 

 

25 to Life Tattoos – Slicknick

As some people might already know, Ade recently moved to a different tattoo shop, called 25 to Life Tattoos in Rotterdam.

A bit more information about the other artist/owner of the shop, Nico Mensinga a.k.a Slicknick. Nick who’s the owner of the shop, is a known artist in the tattoo world for over the last 15 years. 10 years ago he opened his own tattoo studio at the Pannekoekstraat in Rotterdam. Nico is mostly known for his solid and clean old school and Japanese work, he’s the right guy if you’re looking for a real traditional and unique tattoo design. You definitly have to go and check out more of his great work on his FB page!

For more information about the shop and the artists, Slicknick & Ade Itameda you can find on the 25 to Life Tattoos Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/25ToLifeTattoos And keep an eye on this Facebook page because soon there will be two other artists working in the shop, Dickie de Wit, known for his old school work, will regularly start taking a spot on Thursday’s and the Japanese tattoo artist, Horishachi Osaka is coming to Europe again and will be doing a guest-spot at the shop from the 9th till 13th of september. He’s known for his traditional Tebori-style of tattooing. Send an email to make an appointment with all relevant information to: slicknick@hetnet.nl 

So drop by at this great shop in the heart of Rotterdam and come by to make an appointment or to check out their portfolio’s!

 

– Lielo

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THAI NAGA HALF SLEEVE

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Nāga themed half sleeve on left arm. 

Garuda themed half sleeve on right arm.

This is the result of a great project about the ancient characters Garuda & Naga. Showing above is the left arm with the Naga theme. The right arm is posted on this blog before and has a Garuda theme. This was a quite challenging project for me because I never drew a dragon before in my life. This is my first dragon, sounds weird, but it’s true. We choose to use the Thai dragon called Naga and surrounded it with Thai ornaments based on traditional Thai carvings. The customer wanted to have a contrast between the left arm and the right arm. To learn more about the Thai dragons I had to find some books telling me a little bit more of the stories behind these ancient characters. I found out these stories are incredibly complicated. Both of these characters appear in as well Buddhism and Hinduism mythology. I focussed on the Buddism interpetation of the Garuda (Even the stories about Garuda of Hinduism & Buddhism have similarities). I’m always amazed about the Thai ornaments and carvings found on temples and houses. Great piece to work on! More of this!

– Ade Itameda

A little bit more about Garuda & Nāga:

In Buddhist mythology, the Garuda are enormous predatory birds with intelligence and social organization. Another name for the Garuda is Suparṇa which means “well-winged, having good wings”. Like the Nāga, they combine the characteristics of animals and divine beings. They don’t know the exact size of the Garuda, but they say that his wings have a span of many ‘miles’ wide. They also say that when a Garuda’s wings flap, they create hurricane-like winds that darken the sky and blow down houses. A human being is so small compared to a Garuda that a man can hide in the plumage of one without being noticed. They are also capable of tearing up entire banyan trees from their roots and carrying them off. They also have the ability to grow large or small, and to appear and disappear at will. The Garuda have kings and cities and at least some of them have the magical power of changing into human form when they wish to have dealings with people.

The Garuda are enemies to the Nāga, a race of intelligent serpent or dragon-like beings, whom they hunt. The Garuda at one time caught the Nāga by seizing them by their heads; but the Nāga learned that by swallowing large stones, they could make themselves too heavy to be carried by the Garuda, wearing them out and killing them from exhaustion. The Buddhist Nāga generally has the form of a great cobra-like snake, usually with a single head but sometimes with many. At least some of the Nāga are capable of using magic powers to transform themselves to look human just like Garuda. In Buddhist painting, the Nāga is sometimes portrayed as a human being with a snake or dragon extending over his head. They believe that Nāga live on Mount Sumeru, among the other minor deities, and in various parts of the human-inhabited earth. Some of them are live in the water, in streams or lakes and others are living in the earth, in underground caverns.

As you might know, the Mekong is one of the longest rivers in Southeast Asia. The legend of the Nāga is a strong and sacred belief held by Thai and Lao people living along this river. Many pay their respects to the river because they believe the Nāga still rule in it, and locals hold an annual sacrifice for the Nāga. Each ceremony depends on how each village earns its living from the Mekong River. For instance, through fishing or transport. Local residents believe that the Nāga can protect them from danger, so they are likely to make a sacrifice to Nāga before taking a boat trip along the Mekong River.

 

All these tattoo designs are custom made by Ade Itameda and created uniquely for each client and made by modern tattoo machines. They are based on personal ideas/symbols of his clients.  None of these designs will be re-used again. 

Copyright © Ade Itameda 2012. All rights reserved.

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CORLEONE

 

 

Cornell’s a.k.a Corleone’s chest-piece done by Ade.

Based on Vajra and lotus flowers.

 

 

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BEAUTIFUL BACKS

All tattoos are made by Ade Itameda.

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TIBETAN ARM PIECE

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The symbol in the top is named Tram.

Traṃ is the seed syllable of Ratnasambhava.

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MARTIN’S SIDE PIECE

When used in Buddhist literature, the Sanskrit word vajra usually is defined “diamond” or “adamantine.” It can also mean “thunderbolt,” although this definition of vajra is more often associated with Hinduism.

A diamond is spotlessly pure and indestructible. As such, the word vajra sometimes signifies enlightenment, or the absolute reality of shunyata, “emptiness.”

The vajra also is ritual object associated with Tibetan Buddhism, also called by its Tibetan name, dorje. These objects usually are made of bronze, vary in size and have three, five or nine spokes that usually close at each end in lotus shape. The number of spokes and the way they come together, or not, at the ends have numerous symbolic meanings.

In Tibetan ritual, the vajra often is used together with a bell. The vajra is held in the left hand and represents the male principle, upaya, action or means. The bell is held in the right hand and represents the female principle, prajna, wisdom.

A double dorje, or vishvavajra, are two dorjes connected to form a cross. A double dorje represents the foundation of the physical world and is also associated with certain tantric deities.

 

Martin is one of Ade’s most supportive customers. Besides the Barong chest piece and the full Wayang sleeve, he know got an amazing side piece done by Ade. This will be continued later with the Tibetan Bell in the same idea on his other side.

Thanks Martin for all your support so far!

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ENDLESS KNOT

 

The endless knot has been described as “an ancient symbol representing the interweaving of the Spiritual path, the flowing of Time and Movement within That Which is Eternal. All existence, it says, is bound by time and change, yet ultimately rests serenely within the Divine and the Eternal.”

Various interpretations of the symbol are:

  • The Endless knot iconography symbolised Samsara i.e., the endless cycle of suffering or birth, death and rebirth within Tibetan Buddhism.
  • The inter-twining of wisdom and compassion.
  • Interplay and interaction of the opposing forces in the dualistic world of manifestation, leading to their union, and ultimately to harmony in the universe.
  • The mutual dependence of religious doctrine and secular affairs.
  • The union of wisdom and method.
  • The inseparability of emptiness (shunyata) and dependent origination, the underlying reality of existence.
  • Symbolic of knot symbolism in linking ancestors and omnipresence and the magical ritual and meta-process of binding (refer etymology of Tantra, Yoga and religion)
  • Since the knot has no beginning or end it also symbolizes the wisdom of the Buddha.

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VAJRA CHEST

Vajra. In Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond. Vajra was also the son of Aniruddha and great grandson of Shri Krishna. As a material device, the vajra is a ritual object, a short metal weapon—originally a kind of fist-iron like Japanese yawara—that has the symbolic nature of a diamond (it can cut any substance but not be cut itself) and that of the thunderbolt (irresistible force).

The vajra is believed to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power. It is a ritual tool or spiritual implement which is symbolically used by Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, all of which are traditions of Dharma. Because of its symbolic importance, the vajra spread along with Indian religion and culture to other parts of Asia. It was used as both a weapon and a symbol in Nepal, India, Tibet, Bhutan, Siam, Cambodia, Myanmar, China, Korea and Japan.

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