Tag Archives: Blackwork

TATTOO CONVENTION EINDHOVEN 2012

Yesterday night we got back home from the Tattoo Convention in Eindhoven. It was a great weekend! It was great to see how many people visited the convention this weekend and everything was very well organized. We saw a many familiar faces and we had a lot of nice conversations. Ade also won the 1st price of Black & Grey Big at saturday with his Polynesian inspired dotwork piece he did on Eric.

See you next year again! Thanks to all the people who came by at our booth this weekend!

The other news is that we might be joining the Tattoo Convention in Alkmaar on 17 & 18 November! It’s still not 100% sure, but just keep an eye on our blog or Facebook.

Underneath here you can find a small impression of the Tattoo Convention in Eindhoven. More photo’s will be uploaded soon.

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STEFAN’S SLEEVE

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POLYNESIAN INSPIRED + FREE SPOT IN EINDHOVEN

Polynesian inspired piece Ade recently did on mr. John from Zeeland. Click on the photo for a bigger preview.

Ade still has a free spot left on the Tattoo Convention in Eindhoven on the saturday 3th & sunday 4th November of this year. If you’re interested in getting tattooed at that convention, send us an email on thisis369@gmail.com

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ARMS

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JOEL’S SLEEVE

Click on the image for a bigger preview.

Ade finally finished the sleeve of our best friend, Joel. The sleeve consists elements like the Merkaba, Yantra, Tibetan wheel of life, Aum, and Indonesian ornaments.

Soon a small part will be added on the top of the sleeve.

Thanks to Joel for your friendship and never ending support!

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BLACK WORK

Photo by Holy Bird.

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ARM

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TATTOOS ADE

Aksara jawa lettering and flower inspired by batik ornaments

Aksara jawa:

The earliest known writing in Javanese dates from the 4th Century AD, at which time Javanese was written with the Pallava alphabet. By the 10th Century, the Kawi alphabet, which developed from Pallava, had a distinct Javanese form.

By the 17th Century, the Javanese alphabet, also known as tjarakan or carakan, had developed into its current form. During the Japanese occupation of Indonesia between 1942 and 1945, the alphabet was prohibited.

For a period from the 15th Century onwards, Javanese was also written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, called pégon or gundil.

Since the Dutch introduced the Latin alphabet to Indonesia in the 19th Century, the Javanese alphabet has gradually been supplanted. Today it is used almost exclusively by scholars and for decoration. Those who can read and write it are held in high esteem.

  • Javanese is a syllabic alphabet – each letter has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels can be indicated using a variety of diacritics which appear above, below, in front of or after the main letter.
  • Each consonants has two forms: the aksara form is used at the beginning of a syllable, while the pasangan form, which usually appears below the aksara form, is used for the second consonant of a consonant cluster and mutes the vowel of the aksara.
  • There are a number of special letters called aksara murda or aksara gedhe (great or important letters) which are used for honorific purposes, such as to write the names of respected people.
  • The order of the consonants makes the following saying, “Hana caraka, data sawala padha jayanya, maga bathanga” which means “There were (two) emissaries, they began to fight, their valor was equal, they both fell dead”

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SAM + JOEL

Sam wanted to make a tattoo influenced by the place where he has his roots. His family comes from Manado, Sulawesi. Where the owl is an important symbol. Ade turned it into a more modern version.

Joël, wanted to get tattooed for more then 12 years, but could not find the suitable design. We met him a couple of weeks ago and it directly clicked. And day by day Ade started to design an unique design for him, based on him as a person.

Because Joël is a light-painter, you can see his work here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joelkiel1982/, and a creative mind, he told us:

My creativity starts in my mind, after that it flows through my heart, through my arms, into my hands‘.

A little explanation about the piece:

The upper part is the Sri Yantra, which excists out of 9 triangles which are all created out of the center point, the Bindu. It’s an symbol of man and woman, and also for: Shiva (the male) and Shakti (Female). For Joël it symbolizes the connection between new ideas and ideals. For creation and creativity.

The text is Om Mani Padme Hum, a mantra. For Joël it means being proud, passional and a new start. The mantra is mirrored on the other side to show the two sides of life, black and white, life and death etc. You can also see the Wheel of Dharma which is a symbol that has represented Dharma, the Buddah’s teaching of the path to enlightenment.

For a first tattoo, this design was kinda heavy. But Joël seperated the man from the boys and handled the pain very well ;) This piece will be continued later to be a full sleeve.

All photo’s made by Lielo photography.

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