Tag Archives: Batik

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Karya ini terinspirasi dari motif yang pertama kali, saya lihat di Solo, dari koleksi batik pak Hartoyo, kedua kali, saya melihatnya dari koleksi @iwantirta_batik.


 

ATTENTION!

Because I’m very busy atm. and I’m running out of time doing tattooing, sketching for new designs, replying customers and focussing on finding new inspiration. No matter how much time I would like to put into it, I simply don’t have enough time to keep the blog up to date.

Thanks a lot everybody for your understanding!

But if you want to stay up to date about my recent work and want to know what I’m currently doing and where I’m working at the moment, please keep an eye on my pages:

http://www.facebook.com/adeitameda

http://www.facebook.com/adeitamedatattoo

https://www.instagram.com/adeitameda/

Soon I will make an important announcement, so stay tuned!

– Ade

 

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnée, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 卐 or 卍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

Bali_2

The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Tattoo_Energy

Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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BATIK PATTERN MEANINGS – THE PRODIGY NEW MUSIC VIDEO

Kawung

In my work you will often find some returning patterns and shapes on the background. Because I always get inspired by the patterns you can find on the traditional clothing & fabrics from Indonesia and also because they match very well with the other ornaments or images I use, I love to use them in my work.

Those patterns on the fabrics are made by a special dyeing technique called Batik. What many people might not know is that those patterns are not just random patterns, but that they have a much deeper meaning behind them. And that some patterns can only be found in specific areas of Indonesia. Many Indonesian batik patterns are symbolic. For example infants that are carried in batik slings decorated with symbols designed to bring the child luck, and certain batik designs are reserved for brides and bridegrooms, as well as their families. Some designs are reserved for royalties, and even banned to be worn by common people. Even a person’s rank can be determined by the pattern of the batik he or she wears.

Some of the traditional batiks show patterns mixed with images from for example butterflies, birds and other animals. In the end of 16th century, the majority of the Islands in the region of Java had adopted Islamic faith. This change strongly influenced Javanese textile designs as Islam forbids the depiction of humans and animals. This prohibition brought about a variety of stylized and modified ornaments as symbols, such as flowers and geometric patterns, known as Ceplok. The Ceplok patterns were the way in which batik makers attempted to get around the prohibition, creating simple elements which represented animals and people in a non-realistic form.

BATIK KAWUNG

Kawung_2

For example this Batik Kawung, that I used as an inspiration for the tattoo I made shown above. Batik Kawung is one of the oldest batik motifs and is worn by the king and the family. Known in Java since the 13th century, and appears on Hindu temple walls such as the Prambanan. The Kawung pattern symbolizes justice and power.

Batik Kawung pattern has a meaning; symbolizing the hope for human beings that they will always remember their origins. This pattern consists of four circle focused on a point means a King that is assisted by his servants. Actually ‘Kawung’ or ‘Kolang kaling’ is also a name of Palm fruit (Areca Palm blossom) that Indonesian people love to eat.

Part of the Ceplok (circle) family of designs, the Kawung can be arranged as intersecting circles in some of its variations, making dynamic repeated patterns.

 

PARANG RUSAK

Parang_3

Another example is Batik Parang Rusak. Parang means weapon, literally defective big knife (like a sword). It symbolizes power and strength. Batik with a Parang Rusak pattern is originally worn exclusively by knights and people of authority, this particular batik motif must be processed with serenity and patience. If a mistake is made during the process, it is believed that its magical power will disappear. It’s a traditional batik pattern from a special district of Yogyakarta. The curved lines of a Parang motif portray waves, symbolizing the center of nature’s powers and referring to the king and his powers. There are even more variations of Parang Rusak patterns, such as Parang Rusak Barong, Parang Kusuma, Parang Klitik, Parang Klitik Mentik, etc.

Parang

 

Tattoos all done @ 25 to Life Tattoos in Rotterdam.

 

 

 

NEW MUSIC VIDEO CLIP OF THE PRODIGY – GET YOUR FIGHT ON

How nice it is when one of you’re old customers is texting you telling that you have to check out the new video clip of The Prodigy because the tattoos you made on them are in there. Great! Thanks a lot guys :)

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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MAYARATIH COUTURE FOR ADE ITAMEDA

 

Last time when we visited Indonesia, Maya Ratih a good friend of us, designed and custom made a batik jacket for Ade. Which he can wear at conventions and formal occasions, something traditional with a modern, more present-day touch. Again thank you for this great gift!

Click on a photo for a bigger preview
Photo’s by Joel Kiel 

 Making of… 

 

 

 

MayaRatih couture

MayaRatih_logo

MayaRatih_profile

Maya works under the name MayaRatih couture  which was established in 2009 and founded by Maya Ratih herself. Besides being a fashion designer, she’s also know for her work as a professional makeup artist.
In 2005 Maya Ratih graduated from ESMOD fashion school of Jakarta and she had few rewards and accolades from her peers and industry professionals during her course; Maya earned experience by working with some well-known designer for couple years. And also she took an additional makeup course at Marta Tilaar and Andiyanto.
Click on a photo for a bigger preview

 

MayaRatih couture focusses on making stunning wedding, evening dresses & gowns. And recently is also offering modern Kebaya, cocktail dresses and men’s suit.
All of their collections are homemade and most of them are custom made especially for each customer; therefore they have a huge selection of high quality fabrics and materials to hand work details of each gown. They are always ensuring that each customer feels special and are empowered to make their dream dress a reality. They always aim for something unusual, something unique. A great combination between the old and the new. Inspired by the traditional Indonesian fabrics and clothing styles, combined in a revolutionary new way.

 

“I believe that fashion is not about what you wear it, but how you wear it, it is form of expansion of one’s identity. I live it. I breathe it. I express it.” – Maya Ratih

 

So if you’re looking for your dream wedding dress or the perfect suit? Something different than the usual? Something designed and custom, handmade only for you? Go check them out!
They occasionally join fashion shows and exhibitions, so go check them out!

 

Sunrise Garden. Jl. Surya Nirmala Blok O No.17A
Jakarta, Indonesia
+62 821 103 10003 / +62 21 9992 5222
mayaratihcouture@yahoo.com
 
– Lielo

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Art

GOLD OF THE GODS – WORLDMUSEUM ROTTERDAM

Gold_of_the_Gods

 

Last week I saw a news article online that they currently have an exhibition called the Gold of the Gods from Java at the World Art Museum at the harbor of Rotterdam. So that sounded like something we had to see!

– The mysterious world of the Javanese Kingdom remained closed to outsiders for over a thousand years, with only the statues hewn from lava rock at Borobudur displaying the wealth with which the Javanese rulers venerated their gods. The Wereldmuseum is bringing you a world première with its exhibition Gold of the Gods. It is a privilege to show you the most extensive collection of Javanese gold from the seventh to the eleventh centuries on display today, the beauty of which can barely be grasped by contemporary audiences.
On special occasions Javanese royalty would adorn themselves with jewelry originally intended for the gods, in honor of Vishnu, Shiva, and Parvati by embodying them. The jewelry itself was crafted by the most highly renowned goldsmiths, requiring not only superior craftsmanship but also spiritual knowledge as illustrated by the sagas and legends adorning the individual pieces and that portray the active role played by the gods in Javanese society.
The Wereldmuseum is proud to be the first museum in the world to exhibit this collection. Being aware of our tremendous responsibility not only towards the collector, but also with regard to the collection’s history, our aim was to create a presentation that will enable the audience to tangibly perceive the contemporary mysteries surrounding the works on display.
This production was made possible with the cooperation of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum in Leeuwarden, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and, in particular, the National Museum of World Cultures in Amsterdam and Leiden. These museums were willing to lend us several pieces from their permanent collections to enhance our exhibition. Additionally, the Documentation Centre for Ancient Indonesian Art in Amsterdam lent us several photographs of the Borobudur. We are very grateful for these valuable additions to the exhibition.-

 

Yesterday we had a day off and decided to make a trip to the museum in Rotterdam. It turned out to be a very impressive collection of golden jewelry from Java, holding some very exclusive items which we never saw anywhere else before. The set up of the museum is quite simple but classy. You can get really close to the items, exposed in glass showcases  to be able to see the extreme details and complex designs of this ancient jewelry.

Beside the exhibition of the Indonesian gold, there’s a big Tibetan / Japanese section in the museum. Showing a great collection of buddha statues in all different forms and size’s and a great example of a traditional Buddhistic temple. Even the Dalai Lama personally visited the museum in May last year! At the end of the exhibition you will find a gift shop, with a small book section selling a great selection of books about Indonesia,Tibet, batik, keris, wayang, the Pacific, buddhism, etc!

 

Ratu_KidulI was very happy to find this little book about Kanjeng Ratu Kidul by Ruud Greve, The Legend of the South Sea Queen. A Javanese mystery that fascinates me for years already. Soon more about this story on the blog!

Overall it was a nice, educative day out. We would definitely recommend this exhibition / museum to everybody who is interested in ancient jewelry or the Indonesian / Tibetan heritage in general.

You can still visit this exhibition till 6 April 2015.

Entrance: 15,- + free audio tour / CJP: 3,- / free guided tours on every Sunday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold_of_the_Gods_8

 

For more information: http://www.wereldmuseum.nl/

 

 

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FEMALE CHEST DESIGN + LATE NIGHT DRAWING

Chest

Click on photo to see a bigger version.

Female chest design Ade did recently. It’s always great to see how an idea, turns into a sketch, a design and eventually into the end result a tattoo, permanently placed on the skin. Sometimes done in one, sometimes in multiple sessions.

Book

Ade has also been working till late at night (always the best moment to draw!) on a traditional batik design for a great project for the next year. We can’t reveal to much about it yet, but you can find out more about it on the International Tattoo Convention in Frankfurt! Another reason to attend this great convention!

 

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BACK!

Ade_Itameda_Yenni

It’s been a while… We just arrived back in Holland again after an unexpected visit to Indonesia. First of all we want to say thank you for all the people that send an email to make an appointment with Ade to get tattooed in Indonesia. Due to the reason of our visit and the limited amount of time we had this time, Ade didn’t had the opportunity to book everyone in. Ade will save all of your emails and will let you know when he’s planning  to return to Indonesia again. If you didn’t send an email yet and you’re interested in making an appointment with Ade when he returns to Indonesia again, please send your ideas, possible placement and size + reference images to thisis369@gmail.com.

About Ade’s schedule in Holland, we’re currently booking in appointments for the new year. So be quick to book in your app. if you don’t want to wait to long!

Underneath here you can find Ade’s part of the interview with Lars Krutak for the Hungarian Tattoomagazin (http://www.tattoomania.hu/)

 

Ade by Lars Krutak in Hungary

 

 

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BATIK STAMPS

Wahyu_Tumurun

Ade’s last piece is based on the Batik pattern, called Wahyu Tumurun from Yogjakarta. Wahyu Tumurun literally means ‘Divine blessing’ or ‘Revelation’. This motive is a symbol for humans wish for God’s blessing and enlightenment. Mostly people wear this batik if they’re hoping for a job promotion or recognition by their peers and superiors or simply to attain a better and prosperous life.

One of the tools they use to make a batik pattern on the traditional clothing of Indonesia like the one shown above are batik stamps. I’ve always been highly fascinated by those stamps. Batik stamps, or mostly called ‘cap‘, was invented around 1845 and mostly made of copper. Sometimes you will find batik stamps made of wood. The stamps are used to make the process of making batik easier.

They are used by dipping them into hot wax (Bee-wax) mixed with paraffin and applied to the cloth in a design. Then the cloth is dipped into a dye. All of the areas of the cloth that are covered with the wax do not absorb the dye and remain in their original color. When the cloth is dry, more wax is applied and then the cloth is dyed again, usually in a more darker color. This process will be continued until the desired design is completed. After that the wax is removed completely by ‘melting’ the cloth.

The stamps itself are great works of art. The’re made with total precision and eye for detail. I like to collect those stamps myself and I spend many hours wandering around on flea-markets to find these beautiful objects!

Batik_Stamp_6

(Click for bigger size)

For customers from Indonesia:

Ade is not booking in new customers for tattoo-appointments in the time that he will be here in Indonesia (Until 5 June). Thank you for all of your emails! He wishes he could work out all of them, but there’s not enough time to handle all of your requests.  Ade will probably return back to Indonesia later this year, so you can still send an email with your idea’s, placement and size to thisis369@gmail.com

Just keep an eye on the blog to know where Ade is working at the moment! 

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INDONESIAN SLEEVES

Ade has been working on three Indonesian inspired sleeves for three great guys. In the first photo you can see a sleeve with elements of the traditional Indonesian Wayang shadow puppets play. On the lower arm you can see the Gunungan, the opener of the Wayang shadow puppets play. On the top of the arm there’s an Javanese mask, used during traditional celebrations and ceremony’s. And around it you can see ornaments inspired by Balinese stone-carvings and waves.

In the second photo you can see a sleeve which is also inspired by traditional Indonesian images. On top of the arm you can see the all known symbol of Indonesia, the head of the Garuda bird. Also combined with ornaments and flowers which are based on Balinese stone carvings and clothing patterns. And the sleeve is closed with a Batik Parang pattern (This sleeve is still in progress).

In the third photo you see a sleeve which is influenced by the wave pattern you can find in all the Indonesian passports, with as a background the pattern of the Flower of Life. And on the lower part of the arm you see an ornament which is mostly seen in Batik Ceplok patterns. (The circle in the middle is an ‘imperfect circle’ and not done by Ade).

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ARMS

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