Tag Archives: Asia

BOLD AND BRIGHT TATTOO PARLOR

Thanks @jotamoyamartin_ for the video đŸ™đŸŒđŸ™đŸŒđŸ™đŸŒFor inquires and bookings boldandbrighttattooparlor@gmail.com —————————————————- ———-#balitattooartist #boldandbrighttattoo #balitattoo #balitattoostudio #balitattooshop #canggutattoo #canggutattooshop #canggutattoostudio #canggubali #canggu #surf #oldschool #bali #oldschooltattoo #thebalibible #traditionaltattoo #tattoo #tattoos #balitraditionaltattoo #tattooshopbali #tattoostudiobali #tattoostudiocanggu #seminyaktattooshop #seminyaktattoostudio #seminyak #kuta #kutatattooshop #tattoobali

Posted by Bold and Bright Tattoo and Design on Wednesday, July 4, 2018

 

I’m currently working at Bold and Bright Tattoo Parlor in Bali, Indonesia.

If you are interested in making an appointment with me, send me an email on adeitameda03@gmail.com and include all relevant information (see my website -> http://adeitameda.com/appointments)

See you there.!

❈ Ade Itameda

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SWASTIKA SLEEVE – TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Swastika

Some progress on this Indonesian sleeve I’m working on. For this sleeve I used a batik design from Java and combined it with Balinese ornaments and a Swastika pattern which can be found in Bali.

The Swastika is still an important symbol in Hinduism in Bali and I think it’s too bad that after the 2nd World War, people looked at this symbol in a different, more negative way. I hope that we can take a positive view on it again.

SWASTIKA IN BALI

The swastika (also known as the gammadion cross, cross cramponnĂ©e, or manji) (as a Chinese character: 捐 or 捍) is a symbol that generally takes the form of an equilateral cross, with its four legs bent at 90 degrees. It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia.

Bali_2

The Swastika sign can be seen all around in Bali, especially on Balinese Hindu temples. Besides temples they can also be seen in houses or community buildings. For example; On a house for the dead, it means a symbol for reincarnation, happiness and new creation, to accompany the dead on there journey in other worlds. In Bali this symbol simply means balance in relationship.

For the Balinese Hindu’s a balanced life is very important, and that ideal life is indicated by three good relationships. The first is good relationship between human and the Almighty God. Next, the harmonious relationship among the human race. Third, a good relationship with life lower than human such as animals and plants.

 

 


 

TATTOO ENERGY MAGAZINE

Tattoo_Energy

Years ago, I was always searching & asking all my friends who have been out of Indonesia to get me this magazine. Normally I received it in a couple of months after the magazine came out. I learned a lot from this magazine, staring at the amazing artists inside it. That was my dream, that one day I would be in this magazine. A couple days ago, one of my dreams came true. One of my works is published in this magazine :), big or small, I very appreciate it.

Thanks to Miki Vialetto to give me this chance. Awesome.!

For more information & to order the magazine check: http://www.tattoolife.com/

 

– Ade Itameda

 

 

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GANESHA

 

Ganesha_Aida

 

A while ago Ade finished a back-piece on Michelle. To explain the meaning of the Ganesha in one sentence is technically seen impossible. The story behind ‘Lord Ganesh’, the famous Hindu Elephant God, is so complex that there’s not only one way of explaining it.

I will try to tell you a little bit more about this famous religious figure, found mostly in India. Ganesha, also called Ganesh or Ganapanti Tantra is seen as the biggest deity of Hinduism, a deity with a head of a elephant. He is the God of wisdom and knowledge, takes away obstacles in life and he is the protector of travellers. Hindu’s pray to Ganesha before they start something new, like a new job or moving out to a new house. Ganesha is the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is mostly portrayed with and mouse or a rat, named Mushika, as his ‘Vahana’ (vehicle).

When Ganesh was still very young, he wanted to be left alone and preferred to spend his time wandering around by himself. Because of that reason and because of the fact that Shiva had started a war, Shiva never had the opportunity to really get to know his son. After years and years of battle’s Shiva returned to Parvati and Ganesh. When he arrived at the house he saw an intruder. And because he was so incredibly sanguineous he instantly decapitated the intruder. But he didn’t see that the intruder was  actually his own son! He didn’t recognize Ganesh on the first sight because Shiva never really been close to him. Because Shiva felt devastated  he commended his servants to bring him the head of the first creature they would see alive. After a short period of time they returned with the cut-off head of an elephant. Shiva put the head of the elephant on the lifeless body of his son and Ganesha directly rose from the death and entered history as a half-god with the head of an elephant.

There are many different appearances of Ganesh, every time shown with different attributes. In the case of this tattoo, a key (client’s wish), a lotus and a plate with candy. Mostly Ganesha is portrayed with a big, bare belly and a rose-orange skin, a rat sitting next to his feet and off course an elephant head. Sometimes Ganesha has an symbol between his eye’s and trunk which looks like the number ‘3’, similar to the symbol of Om or Aum; the sound of the vibration out of which the universe was created.

Ganesha is also seen as the one who wrote down the Mahabharata (One of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India). And anywhere in India you will find statues of him which they believe will help travellers to make the decision which way they need to go. Ganesha is always symbolizing the start of something, the first impulse.

 

 

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