Tag Archives: Woman

BEAUTIFUL BACKS

All tattoos are made by Ade Itameda.

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SINTA

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She is the wife of Rama, the seventh avatāra of Vishnu in the Hindu tradition. Sinta is one of the principal characters in the Ramayana, a Hindu epic named after her husband Rama. Sinta was born in Sitamarhi (Punaura) in Bihar and soon after her birth, taken to Janakpur in present day Nepal by her father, Janaka. She is esteemed as the standard setter for wifely and womanly virtues for all Hindu women. Understood theologically in Hinduism, Sinta is an avatāra of Lakshmi.

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ANIA JALOSINSKA

Yesterday Lielo got tattooed by the sweet Ania Jalosinska!

Ania Jalosinska is a graphic and fashion designer, who has been studying under Lane Turowksi and is now producing one-of-a-kind highly dynamic tattoos.

Her design background comes through strongly in her tattoo art balancing visual impact, form and pieces that are anything but static.

If you want to see more of her work:

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=720750683

http://www.thirtysixtytwo.com/ania.html

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TATTOOS ADE

Aksara jawa lettering and flower inspired by batik ornaments

Aksara jawa:

The earliest known writing in Javanese dates from the 4th Century AD, at which time Javanese was written with the Pallava alphabet. By the 10th Century, the Kawi alphabet, which developed from Pallava, had a distinct Javanese form.

By the 17th Century, the Javanese alphabet, also known as tjarakan or carakan, had developed into its current form. During the Japanese occupation of Indonesia between 1942 and 1945, the alphabet was prohibited.

For a period from the 15th Century onwards, Javanese was also written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, called pégon or gundil.

Since the Dutch introduced the Latin alphabet to Indonesia in the 19th Century, the Javanese alphabet has gradually been supplanted. Today it is used almost exclusively by scholars and for decoration. Those who can read and write it are held in high esteem.

  • Javanese is a syllabic alphabet – each letter has an inherent vowel /a/. Other vowels can be indicated using a variety of diacritics which appear above, below, in front of or after the main letter.
  • Each consonants has two forms: the aksara form is used at the beginning of a syllable, while the pasangan form, which usually appears below the aksara form, is used for the second consonant of a consonant cluster and mutes the vowel of the aksara.
  • There are a number of special letters called aksara murda or aksara gedhe (great or important letters) which are used for honorific purposes, such as to write the names of respected people.
  • The order of the consonants makes the following saying, “Hana caraka, data sawala padha jayanya, maga bathanga” which means “There were (two) emissaries, they began to fight, their valor was equal, they both fell dead”

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TATTOOS ADE

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NEW T-SHIRTS!

 

Mask

Design by Ade Itameda.

Inspired by Javanese masks, used during traditional dances. Underneath the mask there’s 2 keris. Keris are, both a weapon and spiritual object, keris are often considered to have an essence or presence, with some blades possessing good luck and others possessing bad. Salam Budaya means ‘Greeting Culture’.

Printed in a matte, detailed print,
on a black, made of 100% cotton, high-quality t-shirt.

Available in size M, L, XL, XXL.

Model is wearing L.

25,- euro (excl. shipping costs).

 

Batik Flower

Design by Ade Itameda.

Based on flowers used in the traditional, Batik fabrics from Indonesia. In the middle there’s the AUM symbol surrounded by a Bali flower, often used in holy ceremonies. Salam Budaya means ‘Greeting Culture’.

Printed in a matte, detailed print,
on a black, made of 100% cotton, high-quality t-shirt.
Special hand-cut model, with cute short sleeves. Low feminine neck. Long fit.

Available in size S, M, L, and XL.

Model is wearing M.

25,- euro (excl. shipping costs).

You can send your order to: thisis369@gmail.com
Please include in your email the preferred size, name, and address.

(We’re shipping to every country, it depends on the country what the sending costs will be).

We will send you information about payment and the shipping costs for your order.

We would like to keep our items exclusive and limited.
There are only 24 t-shirts printed with this design! 

So be quick, and place your order!

Machine wash cold. Wash dark colors separately. Use non-chlorine bleach only if needed. Tumble dry low. Do not iron decoration. Do not dry clean if decorated. The t-shirts are made of 100% cotton so expect some shrinkage. To lessen this, try hang drying your t-shirts.

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BALI + T-SHIRTS

 

Sorry for our late update! We’re putting the last hand on the new t-shirts! So soon we will upload the 2 new designs! One design for the boys and one design for the girls. We also will be printing bigger size’s for the guys this time! It’s going to be awesome.

Also we’re leaving to Bali on 27 June for a vacation and  Ade will be tattooing for 2/3 days. He’s only working by appointment, so if you want to make an appointment, send an email to: thisis369@gmail.com. Then we will plan you in!

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SKETCHING

Because the last t-shirts we made where a big succes, we decided to design some new ones.

We’re still busy sketching for the new t-shirts, but here’s a little sneak preview of the t-shirt design for the man! The design for the woman t-shirts will follow soon. We can’t tell you allot of details about the new designs, because we want to keep it as a suprise.These t-shirts will be limited again to a total amount of 24 t-shirts per design, and will not be reprinted again.

Soon we will show the new designs, you just need to be a little bit more patient!

We can also announce that Lielo will be selling framed prints of her photo’s. More details will follow soon!

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Art

ORANG GILA

Jakarta has many people who the society considers as ‘orang gila’.

Which literary means: people who suffer any of various disorders in which a person’s thoughts, emotions, or behaviour are so abnormal as to cause suffering to himself, herself, or other people.

These people who are mostly homeless, walking on the streets, with dirty clothes, sometimes begging for money, sometimes just wandering around.

For example ‘Kancut’ (We call him Kancut, because he looks exactly like our friend) He’s an young man, I guess around 30 years old, who always walks around our tattooshop. Sometimes he’s walking around in the park close to the shop, sometimes he’s sleeping in the portal of the house, the cockroaches are his friends. He has dark, half long, curly hair and deep lying eyes, he’s always wearing the same dirty clothes. Always the same emotion on his face. That empty look. I never heard him say any word. I never saw him smile. He’s disconnected from this world. We don’t know much about him.

Then we have an middle aged lady who’s always picking up the trash with a wooden cart. She owns 3 dogs. Mostly her white dog is sleeping on the piles of trash on the wooden cart. I never saw a dog look so happy. She’s taking good care of them. She looks happy, she’s always busy.  Walking around on the crowded streets, collecting the trash people threw away. People told me she was a rich, wealthy lady in the past.

Next to the road, close to Ade’s home, you have an old man dressed like a hippie. He was always wearing the same clothes, but recently he is wearing a new combination. A brown, jacket, with a flower pattern. He looks almost fashionable. He’s always sitting on a pile of stones next to the road, watching people, mumbling. I see confusion in his eyes. Like he’s trying to understand the things around him, but like he can not grab it. Every time when we’re crossing him with the motorbike, I try to catch his eye. He’s never looking at me straight. It’s like he looks straight through me. Sometimes he’s writing sentences about politics, dates, and drawing random ornaments with chalk on the pavement. Letter combinations, numbers. It looks like a secret writing. Codes and prophecy’s. What they mean? Nobody knows, I think only he knows.

It fascinates me, those people. It’s hard to find out who these people are, because most people here ignore them. They are scared that they will attack them or steal from them. It’s almost like they are monsters. Day in day out I see them. And I wonder what they think? What do they believe? What are their dreams? What is their story? How did they end up on the streets? It looks like they are not bothered by anything around them. It almost looks like they are fine with this life, this life without future perspective. A life we’re everything is not sure. They look like they blocked everything around them. We consider them as mental, but maybe if we really think about it, can’t we understand it a little bit?

The constant flashing of motorcycles besides you, the noise, the dirt, the dust, the traffic. For those who ever been to Jakarta will understand. There’s never a moment that there’s no one around you. This city never sleeps. Day and night, there’s people on the street, selling food, meeting each other, etc. And then the thousands of advertisements on the side of the road, filling your head with useless information. The constant warmth. The big clouds of pollution above you, the big social pressure.

This city can drive people crazy.

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TATTOO PLANET

 

 

Model: Lielo
Mua: Eva van der Horst
Fotografie: Safira Nelemans, Papillon Noir
Regie & Styling: Vivian Kramer, Slightly-Sarcastic

 

Lielo got asked by Tattoo Planet magazine if she wanted to do the cover, and it turned out to be great!

On 05-04-2011 you can find this edition of the Tattoo Planet in the bookstores! And next month there will be an interview with Ade Itameda, about his art and tattooing, in the Tattoo Planet.

Don’t miss it!

 

 

 

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